A Continuous Lean. - Page 2

The Athletic Brand For Non-Athletes

Nov 10th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, Sports | by Jake Gallagher

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Does a daily jogger really need the same gear as a marathon runner? Does a biker in the city really need to dress like he’s in the Tour de France? Are gym clothes supposed to look like they were developed by Nasa?

From Andrew Parietti’s perspective the answer to all of these questions is a resounding no. Parietti, along with his business partner and founder Tyler Haney, created Outdoor Voices, an American made athletic-wear brand for non-athletes. The duo, like most of us, enjoy exercise but were tired of the overwrought work out gear which most activewear companies push out today.

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Designing Through Subtraction, Not Addition.

Nov 7th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Menswear, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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The premier C.H.C.M. in-house collection is small, occupying a single rack near the back of Sweetu Patel’s Bond Street shop, but it’s what’s missing from this already pared down selection that reveals the most about Sweetu’s latest endeavor. A few months back we had visited with Sweetu to check out a few samples that he was working on. Among this batch of drafts was a thigh-length quilted pullover jacket from Lavenham that at the time, was unlike anything we had ever seen in stores. We were instantly drawn to the novelty of this jacket. We would have handed over the credit card  for it that day if given the chance. But now, it’s nowhere to found, Sweetu decided not to produce it. Or more accurately, he deleted it from the collection.





Northampton | The Cradle of Shoe Civilization

Nov 4th, 2014 | Categories: Made in England, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

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“Finishing” is the dirtiest word in high-end footwear. As shoe companies have exported their production to China or Bangladesh or any other country where the production practices are as questionable as the quality of the shoes, many English, Italian, and American brands have begun to exploit a convenient loophole when it comes to marking the country of origin. A shoe might be almost entirely produced overseas, but if it is “finished” in England then that company is free to tack on a “Made in England” label.

What exactly is finishing? Well in some cases it means that the shoe is completed in England – pieces are stitched together, the sole is affixed, etc. but in some cases it means that the shoe was finished and little more than the laces were added in England. Of course, countries have now begun to crack down on this, and it’s not exactly clear how many companies have taken advantage of these loose guidelines, but it’s enough to make savvy shoe-buyers weary. As a result, that “Made in England” tag no longer holds as much weight as it once did. Customers now want greater clarity on the exist origin of their footwear, which has narrowed the scope of “Made in England,” down to one area in particular: Northampton.

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In the Books | Pop Up Flea Tokyo

Nov 3rd, 2014 | Categories: Pop Up Flea, Tokyo | by Michael Williams

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If you were following along on Instagram, you would have known that this past weekend we took Pop Up Flea to Tokyo for the first time. We set up shop with a good mix of American and Japanese brands, plus pour-over coffee, custom indigo dying and lots of exclusive items. As one PUF visitor described on Instagram, it was a real deal “American Culture Festival.”  Being the first time we have taken Pop Up Flea so far from home, we were curious to see how the concept would resonate in a place as culturally different as Japan. With a core group of long-supporting brands and an outstanding crew to help us, we succeeded in making the first ever Pop Up Flea Tokyo a huge success.

A very special thanks to Tanner Goods, Tellason, Rancourt & Co., The Hill-Side / Hickoree’s, Filson, Red Wing Heritage, General Knot, The Good Flock, Billykirk, Field Notes, Freemans Sporting Club and Topo Designs for continuing to travel near and far in the name of Pop Up Flea.

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Barbisio | The Art of the Felt Fedora

Oct 29th, 2014 | Categories: Accessories, Hats, Italy, Jake Gallagher | by Jake Gallagher

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The hat hath returned.

And no I’m not referring to the dinky trilbies that you can find at your local mall, nor that raggedy baseball cap in the back of your closet, I’m talking about an honest to God, grown man, make-Gay-Talese-proud fedora. At least for some, that is.

Some call it the Mad Men effect, some point to the revival of classic menswear, some simply chalk it up to pure foppishness, but whatever the reason may be, this (slight) chapeau renaissance has turned the spotlight back towards some illustrious accessories labels that have flown under the radar for far too long.





At Home in the Natural World: Yellowstone in October

Oct 28th, 2014 | Categories: Americana, David Coggins, Fishing | by David Coggins

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Yellowstone National Park is stunning all summer, but in October it’s even more stark and striking. The grass becomes the color of straw, the bison get frost in their fleece and mist rises off the rivers in the cold. Most of the crowds have gone—though there are still knowing visitors—and snow dusts the mountaintops.

Then there’s the Madison River, the main attraction for anglers making their late-season pilgrimage to the Park. Brown trout head into the river to spawn, their color bolder, deeper red and gold. Following the fish are people who wake up early in the freezing dark to go stand in the water. In feels foolish at times, but when it all comes together it’s clear that it’s the right thing to do.





Snow Peak | The Future of Outdoor Clothing

Oct 27th, 2014 | Categories: Camping, Jake Gallagher, Japan, Portland | by Jake Gallagher

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“Future Amish.”

That’s how Chelsea Parrett of Snow Peak’s Portland team describes the brand’s first foray into clothing. It’s a description that would sound laughable or contrived in almost any other situation, but as Chelsea rattles off the expression, it’s as if she’s stolen the words right out of my mouth. Snowpeak’s soul is in Northwest Japan where the brand was founded fifty-six years ago, but since arriving in America in the late nineties they’ve been at the forefront of the “gentleman camper,” movement, which has deftly intertwined aesthetically pleasing designs with highly functional products.

Snow Peak’s camping gear is nothing short of beautiful, to the point that it makes you question whether a coffee mug, or a collapsible stool, or even a spork is better suited for a campsite or a display case at MoMA.  The collection also lies at the midpoint of ingenuity and elegance, but it’s that “future Amish” vibe that places Snow Peak’s clothing in a different realm, one that is far more thought provoking than many of its outdoor competitors.

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