A Continuous Lean. - Page 2

Iconic Campaign Buttons of Yore.

Feb 14th, 2015 | Categories: Americana, Jake Gallagher | by Jake Gallagher

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While, it’s not our place to wax on about the ways in which our country’s political rhetoric has changed, we would like to reminisce on the lost art of the campaign button. Unlike the gaudy and contrived pins of contemporary campaigns, classic buttons were crisp, clear, and generally just far more iconic. Some of them are bold, like Ike’s countless punchy slogans (he must’ve had quite the copywriting team) while some of them just seem absurd, as in Edmun Muskie’s fishing pin, but they’re all worth remembering, even if the candidate was not.

IkeandDick

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Not So Standard.

Feb 11th, 2015 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear, Shopping, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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For many Japanese brands, it’s not enough to only have one line. Companies like Beams, Ships, and United Arrows love to stack up sub-brands and diffusion lines like a hastily made parfait of complementary aesthetics, which each layer bleeding over into the offer. The differences between two given brands under the same umbrella can often be tough to discern – one might be workwear-meets-streetwear, while the other might be streetwear-meets-workwear. It all tends to get lost in translation. Fortunately for Western audiences though, Japanese brands are also known for being masters of visual merchandising. Often times each label will get it’s own lookbook or ad campaign, which is (in most cases) the closest that we’ll ever come to actually interacting with these brands, as many of them are not widely available outside of Japan. This no longer rings as true for Beams and United Arrows, which have recently upped their American and European stockists, but it is still quite true for Journal Standard, another multi-label Japanese brand.

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MG Autos | The Midgets of the Track

Feb 10th, 2015 | Categories: Cars, History, Jake Gallagher, Motorsports | by Jake Gallagher

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American cars of the 1960′s can be summed up in one word: big. Big engines, big hoods, big windows, big benches, even big headlights. The American road was strewn with these glimmering metallic behemoths throughout the sixties, but across the pond, things were quite different. There were British companies like Rolls Royce, Aston Martin, and Bentley that aimed for luxury, creating an automotive experience that was akin to an ultra-cushy carriage ride, and then there were companies like MG. While their competitors were busy inserting plush leather seats and squishy handling into their rides, MG was playing out on the track, producing compact cars that epitomized English speed. Their coupes were designed to hug sharp turns, leap off the line, and dart around corners, setting the benchmark for the British sports car for decades to come.

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Gitman Printage | Gitman’s Greatest Hits

Feb 9th, 2015 | Categories: A Conversation With, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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Not since the 1960′s have there been this many American based shirt brands. And yet, despite the variety of labels attached to them, never have so many shirts looked exactly alike.

We don’t mean to be overly critical, we do understand that there are only so many mills a shirt company can buy from, only so many different color combinations they can choose from, only so many ways they can reconfigure a plaid or a paisley or a polka dot. And of course, any company attempting to create clothing in America deserves our support. We just wish more companies would approach their design like Gitman Vintage does.





SIGNALS

Feb 9th, 2015 | Categories: SIGNALS | by Michael Williams

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  • The style of the Empire State. A look at NY’s best dressed designers. [Mr Porter]
  • The lost Bob Bonis photos (which you can now own) of the 1960s Beatles and Rolling Stones. [eBay] [Pictured]
  • China Inc. investing in ‘Made in USA’ [NBC NEWS]
  • A love letter to the Brannock Device and the joys of proper foot measuring. [Rawr Denim]
  • Quartz attempts to cover #menswear and ends up somewhere between Buzzfeed and the NY Post. [Quartz]

—Good things happening elsewhere. Follow along with ACL on Facebook and Instagram





Why We Should All Respect Hiroshi Fujiwara.

Feb 8th, 2015 | Categories: Design, Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

ThePool

Hiroshi Fujiwara has a resume that most designers could only dream of. In his thirty-plus year career the Fragment Design founder has worked with Nike, Starbucks, Stussy, Neighborhood, Casio, Carhartt, Beats, and Disney. Oh wait, did I say in his career? Because that was just in the past year. Pull back a bit further and you’ll find names like Oakley, Cole Haan, Clarks, Sacai, Visvim, Sophnet, Converse, Levi’s, and Martin Guitar. And that’s just his work as a designer. Fujiwara is also an accomplished musician who has collaborated with Janis Ian and Eric Clapton. Oh, and if that’s not impressive enough he appeared in Lost in Translation.





A Victory for American Made Sneakers.

Feb 5th, 2015 | Categories: Footwear, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

Victory

Victory Sportswear might just be the most important new sneaker brand out there, but there’s actually nothing new about them. We had never heard of Victory until we spotted them at this year’s Capsule trade show, but we were immediately taken by the brand’s suede and mesh trainers which look like a cross between something Carl Lewis might’ve worn at the ’84 Olympics and a pair of sneakers you might find at an orthopedic store.

Truthfully though, it wasn’t the look of the shoes that got us excited, but rather the fact that they were made in America. The only other brand making shoes in America right now is New Balance, and just like them, Victory produces their sneakers in New England (NB in Maine, Victory in Massachusetts). In fact, Victory has made its entire collection in its Massachusetts factory since the company was founded in 1980′s. The question is, where has it been this whole time? And how are we not surprised that it was Daiki and the Engineered Garments team that has unearthed them for our collective pleasure.