Sports | A Continuous Lean.

Arnold Palmer | The Swinging King of the Polo

Jul 20th, 2014 | Categories: Americana, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Sports, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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With seven major golf championships, a Presidential Medal of Freedom, a spot in the PGA Hall of Fame, and one helluva refreshing beverage to his name Arnold Palmer has racked up quite the cache of accolades in his day, but we think he’s deserving of just one more – The King of the Polo Shirt. During his dominating run through the professional golf circuit in the late fifties and sixties Palmer was best known for three things: his immaculate swing, his unflappable attitude, and his endless supply of polo shirts.

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Where to Watch The World Cup in NYC.

Jun 12th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, New York City, Sports | by Jake Gallagher

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There’s sports and then there’s The World Cup.

The Stanley Cup, The Super Bowl, March Madness, The Tour de France, even the Olympics are no doubt exciting, but they pale in comparison to the global singularity of The World Cup. For that one summer month every four years the entire world is united around this singular event, tracking each match, each kick, each heart-stopping save that plays out on an international scale.

PR SOCCER





Two Step | Nike x Undercover Gyakusou

May 21st, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Shoes, Sports | by Jake Gallagher

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For many designers, somewhere along the way between concept and execution their vision gets lost in the shuffle, but not so for Jun Takahashi of Japanese label, Undercover. Takahashi is now approaching the fourth year of his Gyakusou collection, a collaborative effort with Nike that exists at the intersection between high fashion and performance running gear.

As anyone that has ever laced up a pair of sneaker can attest, running is as much an emotional pursuit as it is an athletic one. Takahashi has never been one to shy away from emotion in his work. His Undercover collections are often rife with quotes from shoegaze songs, dark tones, and lush textures. As for Gyakusou, which roughly translates into “running in reverse,” as a reference to the fact that Takahashi and his friends run the “wrong way” through Tokyo, the collection has always been a meditation on how runners interact with their environment.





The Ten Greatest Baseball Uniforms of All Time.

May 16th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Sports | by Jake Gallagher

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The grass is (relatively) green, the sky is (relatively) blue, and the weather is (relatively) nice, which means Spring has finally arrived here in New York. Aside from the much needed mercury boost, we here at ACL are also quite glad that along with Spring comes the seasonal debut of America’s pastime. Our various hometown biases aside, we can all agree that few things can top a mid-afternoon baseball game on a mild May day. So, to get us all in the spirit of swing we bring you our list of the ten greatest baseball uniforms of all time.

The 1906 New York Giants - After winning just the second World Series ever, the New York Giants were feeling more than a bit boastful. So, in an act that certainly wouldn’t be allowed today, the Giants decided to plaster their “World’s Champion” title across the front of their uniforms the next season. As they say, if you got it flaunt it.





The Ace of Lace

May 18th, 2011 | Categories: Corey Wilson, Sports | by Corey Wilson

My old pal with a lot of wear, eager for an overhaul.

For the past 25 summers, I’ve played some form of baseball. And while the balls and bats changed from t-ball to baseball to beer-league softball, with the occasional game of wiffle ball in between, I’ve been using the same glove (or mitt) since I was 13…and it was beginning to show. My reliable USA-made Rawlings “Gold Glove Series” Pro 1000-H infielder’s glove, was in tatters. But instead of tossing it out this season, in favor of a newer, fancier model (with a tacky velcro strap!), I decided to have it restored.

Hell, I figured if someone could make my broken down, bench-made brogues look like new, then why not my ball glove? It turns out, there is a guy in Lynbrook, NY (“a small village on Long Island, barely 15 miles from Ebbets Field and 20 miles or so from the Polo Grounds and Yankee Stadium,” according to his web site) that specializes in such a craft. Dick Wilson (no relation), otherwise known as the “Ace of Lace,” has been reviving gloves for nearly 50 years. In his past life, he owned and operated Sportorama (editor’s note: amazing name!), a sporting goods store in nearby Baldwin, NY. But after retiring in 1992, he’s been honing his skills, repairing as many as 30 baseball gloves a month.





CLEVELAND BROWNS CUSTOMER SERVICE c.1974

Dec 27th, 2010 | Categories: Cleveland, Sports | by Michael Williams

A classic exchange between a season ticket holder and the Cleveland Browns front office from 1974. It’s a shame that no one would have the balls to send a reply like this today. The customer is not always right.





The Heater from Van Meter

Dec 21st, 2010 | Categories: History, Sports, WWII | by Michael Williams

Last Wednesday MLB great Bob Feller passed away at the age of 92. Feller, known as “Rapid Robert” had one of the strongest arms — and one of the fastest fastballs — of all time. “The Heater from Van Meter” (as he was also known) is easily among the top five pitchers to ever play the game. A fact that is even more impressive when you consider Feller, who grew up on a farm in Van Meter, Iowa, left the game during his prime years to join the U.S. war effort in the Pacific. It is this sacrifice that makes Bob Feller not only a great baseball player, but a great American.

The story of Pearl Harbor and Bob Feller’s decision to join the military from Once Upon a Game: Baseball’s Greatest Memories via The New York Times.

“I was driving my new Buick Century across the Mississippi River, across the Iowa-Illinois state line, when my world — everyone’s world — changed forever.

It was Dec. 7, 1941. I was driving to my meeting with my Cleveland Indians bosses to hash out my 1942 contract, and out it came on the radio: the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor.

The last thing on my mind right then was playing baseball. I immediately decided to enlist in the United States Navy. I didn’t have to — I was 23 and strong-bodied, you bet, but with my father terminally ill back in Van Meter, Iowa, I was exempt from military service.