Made In England | A Continuous Lean.

Barbour’s Many Bedfellows.

Dec 9th, 2014 | Categories: Collaborations, Jake Gallagher, Made in England, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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Barbour’s been busy. One hundred twenty years after they were founded in South Shields, England, Barbour’s creative output is as high as ever. Not only does the brand’s main line now consist of a handful of collections, including heritage, sporting, and cycling, but the company continues to widen the reach, bringing new collaborations into the fold with each passing season. These collaborations are as varied and interesting as Barbour’s audience, ranging from a mammoth global corporation like Adidas, down to smaller shops such as Soto Berlin. Our count stands at seven collaborations thus far this year, but considering their track record, we wouldn’t be surprised to see Barbour’s collaborations climb into the double digits for 2015.

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Barbour x Norton & Sons Heritage Collection





Northampton | The Cradle of Shoe Civilization

Nov 4th, 2014 | Categories: Made in England, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

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“Finishing” is the dirtiest word in high-end footwear. As shoe companies have exported their production to China or Bangladesh or any other country where the production practices are as questionable as the quality of the shoes, many English, Italian, and American brands have begun to exploit a convenient loophole when it comes to marking the country of origin. A shoe might be almost entirely produced overseas, but if it is “finished” in England then that company is free to tack on a “Made in England” label.

What exactly is finishing? Well in some cases it means that the shoe is completed in England – pieces are stitched together, the sole is affixed, etc. but in some cases it means that the shoe was finished and little more than the laces were added in England. Of course, countries have now begun to crack down on this, and it’s not exactly clear how many companies have taken advantage of these loose guidelines, but it’s enough to make savvy shoe-buyers weary. As a result, that “Made in England” tag no longer holds as much weight as it once did. Customers now want greater clarity on the exist origin of their footwear, which has narrowed the scope of “Made in England,” down to one area in particular: Northampton.

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Drake’s Autumn Winter ’14 | Tried and True

Aug 4th, 2014 | Categories: England, Jake Gallagher, London, Made in England, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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Lookbooks are not really about clothing anymore.

They can be focused on a brand’s attitude, their surroundings, their friends, their favorite beer, maybe their favorite plant, but what they rarely provide is insight on how to actually wear the clothes. All that posturing, all that ambiance, all that hyper specific styling rarely translates into something that you can actually wear. Not so with Drake’s London though, their Autumn Winter ’14 lookbook not only conveys the brand’s style, but it’s actually an asset to their audience.





Simplicity is Beauty.

Jun 29th, 2014 | Categories: Made in England, Video | by Michael Williams

The idea of “simplicity” seems to get thrown around quite a bit. It’s something Apple has used to build a literal mountain of cash (that and 10,000 other genius ideas — lest we get carried away here) and it’s a concept that everyone seems to rally around regardless if their business is making cheap fast fashion or high-end luxury. At the same time, it’s something that lies at the core of ACL, but simple is not the only thing I’m looking for. It’s when simple is combined with tradition, consistency and quality that things really become an obsession.

What does this have to do with a film about scissors? Everything.





Sea Island and Sunspel | The Story is in the Seams

Apr 28th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Made in England, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

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That’s the percentage of cotton in the world that can be classified as “Sea Island Cotton,” which raises the immediate question: how does one material become so scarce? The answer involves weevils, Queen Victoria, and the Caribbean climate, but most of all it involves a textile that is far superior to all of its cotton cousins.

Sea Island Cotton is harvested from The Gossypium Barbadense plant, which hails from South America, and had been grown in the West Indies since the 15th century. Yet, it wasn’t until 1786 when the plant arrived in the sea islands of South Carolina that it really began to infiltrate the U.S. and European markets. In comparison to other cottons, Sea Island is just plain better. It’s stronger, silkier, softer, and therefore extremely desirable.

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH





Talking Manchester and Menswear | Private White V.C.

Feb 13th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Made in England, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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For a brand that was only officially introduced in 2011, Private White V.C. packs a heritage that’s far beyond their years. The brand operates out of a factory that their namesake, Private Jack White worked at back in the early twentieth century, and it was this legacy that led White’s great grandson, James Eden to take over the factory a handful of years ago. This appreciation of the past continues on through in the brand’s designs. Nick Ashley the lead designer of Private White leans heavily on classic English shapes such as harringtons and moto-jackets. Not only does Ashley’s resume include the likes of Dunhill, Kenzo, and Tod’s, but his parents founded Laura Ashley, a company whose impact on the English textile industry cannot be overstated. We had a chance to speak with both James Eden and Nick Ashley about their brand’s history, the future of Private White V.C. and what it means to be a British brand in 2014.

ACL: Unlike many brands, with names that are pure fabrications, Private White was a real person that has a real impact on the shape of your brand. Could you give some background on Private Jack White the man?

James Eden: Private White was a local hero both on the battlefield and in business. He was quite a character who certainly made the most of his celebrity after the War. He loved his life, he loved his ladies and most of all he loved his family and factory.

ACL: White was one of the founding fathers of the Manchester Factory that you produce out of today, so at what point did you all step into the picture and found Private White V.C.?

JE: Even though my great grandfather, Private White, passed away in the late 1940s, my family has always had an emotional attachment to the factory. As a kid growing up, instead of having a paper route or working in a local shop for pocket money like many of my pals did, I would work on the shop floor or in the cutting room – cutting fabric, counting buttons, heaving rolls of cloth, basically doing exactly what I was told! Six years ago the factory was on the brink of going under and so I decided to take a leap of faith and left my job in Finance in the City of London to try and revitalize the Factory.

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Made To Last | North Sea Clothing

Oct 30th, 2013 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Made in England, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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It’s a fine line between being “authentic” and simply playing dress up. Yet, if there’s ever been a label that’s hit that golden sweet spot between these two concepts it’s England’s North Sea Clothing. While we’ve followed and worn North Sea for some time, we got another chance to marvel at the brand’s bullet proof collection first hand in London a few weeks back at the Pop Up Flea and it was a reminder as to just how good this stuff is.