A Continuous Lean.

Barbisio | The Art of the Felt Fedora

Oct 29th, 2014 | Categories: Accessories, Hats, Italy, Jake Gallagher | by Jake Gallagher

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The hat hath returned.

And no I’m not referring to the dinky trilbies that you can find at your local mall, nor that raggedy baseball cap in the back of your closet, I’m talking about an honest to God, grown man, make-Gay-Talese-proud fedora. At least for some, that is.

Some call it the Mad Men effect, some point to the revival of classic menswear, some simply chalk it up to pure foppishness, but whatever the reason may be, this (slight) chapeau renaissance has turned the spotlight back towards some illustrious accessories labels that have flown under the radar for far too long.





At Home in the Natural World: Yellowstone in October

Oct 28th, 2014 | Categories: Americana, David Coggins, Fishing | by David Coggins

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Yellowstone National Park is stunning all summer, but in October it’s even more stark and striking. The grass becomes the color of straw, the bison get frost in their fleece and mist rises off the rivers in the cold. Most of the crowds have gone—though there are still knowing visitors—and snow dusts the mountaintops.

Then there’s the Madison River, the main attraction for anglers making their late-season pilgrimage to the Park. Brown trout head into the river to spawn, their color bolder, deeper red and gold. Following the fish are people who wake up early in the freezing dark to go stand in the water. In feels foolish at times, but when it all comes together it’s clear that it’s the right thing to do.





Snow Peak | The Future of Outdoor Clothing

Oct 27th, 2014 | Categories: Camping, Jake Gallagher, Japan, Portland | by Jake Gallagher

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“Future Amish.”

That’s how Chelsea Parrett of Snow Peak’s Portland team describes the brand’s first foray into clothing. It’s a description that would sound laughable or contrived in almost any other situation, but as Chelsea rattles off the expression, it’s as if she’s stolen the words right out of my mouth. Snowpeak’s soul is in Northwest Japan where the brand was founded fifty-six years ago, but since arriving in America in the late nineties they’ve been at the forefront of the “gentleman camper,” movement, which has deftly intertwined aesthetically pleasing designs with highly functional products.

Snow Peak’s camping gear is nothing short of beautiful, to the point that it makes you question whether a coffee mug, or a collapsible stool, or even a spork is better suited for a campsite or a display case at MoMA.  The collection also lies at the midpoint of ingenuity and elegance, but it’s that “future Amish” vibe that places Snow Peak’s clothing in a different realm, one that is far more thought provoking than many of its outdoor competitors.

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Why We Still Need True Dive Bars

Oct 23rd, 2014 | Categories: Americana, Cocktails, Drinking, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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By definition a dive bar has no definition.

If you ask someone to define a dive bar, their answer won’t be about a dive bar it will be about their dive bar. Whether it’s the drab basement bar where they first sucked down a one dollar High Life, or some one-light-bulb hole in the wall where they continue to drink away the post-work hours, everyone’s vision of a dive bar is inherently personal.

Emily Dickinson once wrote, “I can’t tell you, but you feel it.” I imagine Dickinson was describing love (or just as likely despair) with this line, but her sentiment is just as true for a dive bar. Yes, there’s a certain atmosphere that all dives share. The outdated decor, the dusty bottles, the stone-faced bartender, the stench of stale domestic beers, a dirt cheap prices (often because the beer is just so damn bad.) We’re all familiar with these dive bar tropes, but what really makes a bar a dive is a feeling. It’s the sense that the world outside has disappeared, and for however long you sit on that raggedy polyester stool everything else can wait. It’s just you, a sweating bottle of beer, and your compatriots. Even if those compatriots are just the thoughts in your head.





An Ode to the Original Six.

Oct 22nd, 2014 | Categories: History, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Sports | by Jake Gallagher

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Hockey is America’s biggest little sport. In the post-lockout era, hockey games are harder to find on TV and the average American probably couldn’t name five current players without the aid of ESPN. But for true hockey fans, the sport is as enthralling as ever and it still is far and away the best professional sport to watch live. Though, most professional leagues are now as polished as a freshly minted trophy, but hockey still feels endearingly ragtag in a way, though much of that is disappearing by the season. Yes, part of this stems from the sport’s lack of true mainstream superstars (in comparison to the NBA or NFL), and the aggressive, often manic gameplay, and of course the fights. But, a large part of it has to do with the jerseys. Tune into a hockey game today and you’ll see many of the same (or close enough to the same) jerseys that players have worn for decades.

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The Pop Up Flea Takes Tokyo

Oct 21st, 2014 | Categories: Pop Up Flea | by Jake Gallagher

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Next week we’re packing up and shipping out as the Pop Up Flea rises in the Land of the Rising Sun. That’s right, we’re taking PUF halfway around the world to bring all of that Americana goodness to Tokyo for the first time ever. We might be strangers in a strange land, but we’re bringing along some familiar faces including the largest and most complete offering from Filson ever to hit Japan. Adding to our recognizable roster of American brands are some of Japan’s finest including Brown’s Beach Cloth, Button Works, and a custom indigo dying booth. The address, info and brand list is below.





Ralph Lauren and The Boy Scouts of Nippon.

Oct 20th, 2014 | Categories: Camping, History, Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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There are vintage finds that make you cry tears of joy. There are vintage finds (mostly of the stained variety) that make you weep for what could have been. And then there are vintage finds that simply leave you scratching your head. A few weeks back, in a downtown consignment store I came upon a vintage find so confounding, so downright unexpected that it has sent me on a quest. The shirt itself was nothing out of the ordinary. Two front pockets, patches on each sleeve, epaulettes up top, really, it looked like any old scouting shirt. Which is why I was drawn to it. Why was this shirt here? Why would a store that sells everything Thom Browne, Rick Owens, and Junya Watanabe be selling a regular old Boy scout shirt? And then I saw the tag. “Boy Scouts of Nippon Designed By Ralph Lauren.”

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