A Continuous Lean.

Shopping Mill Valley | Guideboat Co.

Jan 29th, 2015 | Categories: Made in the USA, Retail, San Francisco | by Michael Williams

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A few months back while visiting San Francisco I met up with Tellason founders Tony Patella and Pete Searson. I’ve known those guys since 2009 when I first interviewed them for ACL and over the course of a few years we’ve become friends. As Tony and Pete are good guys who know a lot about what’s going on, I do my best to connect with them whenever I visit the Bay Area. When we met up for breakfast we spoke about Oakland amongst other things, and I told Pete and Tony how I have been hearing a lot about the city and how I was keen to check it out. They suggested a few places that they thought were interesting and I made a plan to spend the day out in the East Bay. We finished up our coffee and right before I was about to depart Pete mentioned a new shop out in his hometown of Mill Valley. “Oh yeah, you’re going to love this place.” Pete said. After checking things out in Oakland for most of the day I headed for my last stop of the day in Marin. And that’s the story of how I discovered something new in Mill Valley and how I came to love the Guideboat Company.

Inspired by a childhood in the Adirondacks, Stephen Gordon founded Guideboat Co. to be an amazing collection of well-made and long lasting things loosely organized around collection of boats and a nautical theme. The beautiful new store occupies a historic old saw mill which helped give this affluent North Bay town it’s name. It’s the perfect use for the long mothballed site that many in Mill Valley had worried would not be preserved. While it could certainly be considered off the beaten path for a flagship store, Guideboat is an enthralling retail showcase for this ambitious new endeavor. Though this isn’t the first retail launch for Gordon. Way back in 1979 he founded another little company you may know called Restoration Hardware. Guideboat’s other founder Chad Hurley is also no stranger to success himself, having co-founded YouTube. After spending a few hours in the shop in Mill Valley, I’d say these serial entrepreneurs are on to something.

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A Campaign to Save the Disappearing Diner.

Jan 28th, 2015 | Categories: Brooklyn, Food, Important Shit, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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“Don’t it always seem to go, that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.”

It’s been forty-five years since Joni Mitchell first sang that fateful line on her hit track Big Yellow Taxi, but her words continue to ring out to this day. That line has been repeated, and repeated, and repeated over the years but for as straightforward as her sentiment may be, we’re still struggling to grasp the song’s message. This is especially true here in New York, where more and more so-called institutions of the city seem to be disappearing by the day. And no industry seems to be both more at risk, and more revered than restaurants.

At this point, it seems as if any restaurant that’s been around for more than five years, doesn’t serve some blogger approved, Instagram-ready menu of avant garde delicacies, and/or hasn’t found their niche food fad yet, is endanger of shuttering at a moments notice. And in turn, each “we’re closing” announcement is met by a chorus of complaints, and groans, and claims that New York is over. Inevitably though a week passes, and we all forget about it. We bounce back to whatever “hot new restaurant” is peaking that week, or to our favorite dollar slice spot, depending on our particular palette preferences. And honestly, when was the last time any of us ate at Soup Burg, or Cafe Edison, or El Greco or Odessa?





A Whale of a Boat.

Jan 23rd, 2015 | Categories: Americana, Jake Gallagher, Obsessions, Outdoors | by Jake Gallagher

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On a recent episode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, Jerry Seinfeld rolled around Montauk while interviewing Jimmy Fallon. The episode featured a whole lot of star power for one small web short (not to mention one very tiny car) but both celebrities still managed to get upstaged by the unlikeliest of cameos – a boat. But, not just any boat, a thirteen foot Boston Whaler which Seinfeld proudly called, “the greatest boat in the world.” For as hyperbolic as that may sound, Seinfeld’s claim is one-upped by an even bolder statement from the Boston Whaler company itself – that their boats are “unsinkable legends.”





Judging a Magazine by Its Cover

Jan 21st, 2015 | Categories: France, Jake Gallagher, Magazines | by Jake Gallagher

Adam

In case you didn’t already have enough international magazines to sift through, we’d like to introduce you to Adam: La Revue de l’Homme. Normally we wouldn’t say “introduce” in reference to a magazine that hasn’t put out an issue in over forty years, but we feel pretty confident in assuming that none of you have ever heard of Adam before. And if you have, well congratulations on an advanced knowledge of obscure French menswear magazines. Adam was founded by Edmond Dubois in 1925 and was published bimonthly until 1973. Today Adam is best known for its covers, many of which featured drawings by the famous Frano-Italian painter René Gruau, who worked with several high-fashion magazines of the time. Like the widely circulated Apparel Arts drawings, Adam’s covers provide a snapshot (albeit a far more-lighthearted one) of how men approached clothing across the twentieth century.

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The Rarest Sweatshirts in the World.

Jan 19th, 2015 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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To find one of the rarest fabrics in the world you don’t travel to the Italian countryside, or the Scottish Isles, rather you journey seven hours outside of Tokyo, to the Wakayama Prefecture. There on the southeastern coast of Japan you’ll find the Loopwheeler factory, one of the last bastions of Wakayama’s once robust manufacturing industry. Along with Merz B. Schwanen in the Swabian Mountains of Germany, Loopwheeler is one of the only remaining two factories producing authentic loopwheel terry cloth in the world.





SIGNALS

Jan 19th, 2015 | Categories: SIGNALS | by Michael Williams

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  • Hypothermia on a fishing trip inspired Eddie Bauer’s first down jacket. [Mental Floss]
  • Inside a Porsche engine factory. [Sploid]
  • An oldie but a goodie. A look at Brunello Cucinelli’s Solmeo HQ. [Bon Appetit]
  • All sorts of crazy 1950s images from Area 51. [Imgur] [Pictured]
  • Off Duty breaks down the fashion world’s obsession with Patagonia. [Wall Street Journal]

—Good things happening elsewhere. Follow along with ACL on Facebook and Instagram





Engineered Garments | A Club Formed From Cloth

Jan 18th, 2015 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Long Reads, Made in the USA, Menswear, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

Engineered Garments F/W '13

Engineered Garments F/W ’13

I tend to believe that you can’t fully know a person until you meet their friends. The company we choose to keep says a lot, often more than we ever can individually, about who we are as people. On a still, late July evening I found myself considering this as I glanced around Nepenthes, Engineered Garments pseudo-flagship store in Manhattan’s Garment District. The store, despite it’s out of the way location, was teeming with people. A cheery swirl of English and Japanese chatter overpowered the shop’s post-punk soundtrack as pockets of friends conversed beside the racks.

Standing on the second story loft looking down at the gleeful guests below, I realized that this was what has made Engineered Garments such a crucial brand, not only for menswear in America at large, but for me as an individual. The event was organized to celebrate the debut of Engineered Garments Spring/Summer ’15 collection, and fifteen years after the brand’s founding, people of all backgrounds, of all styles, of all occupations, were still gleefully gravitating toward the brand.

EG F/W '14

EG F/W ’14