A Continuous Lean. - Page 4

A Book/Shop in C.H.C.M.

Sep 29th, 2014 | Categories: Books, Jake Gallagher, Men's Stores, Menswear, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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Book/Shop was founded by Erik Heywood in Oakland, California back in 2007 as a way to showcase and sell his substantial collection of used and rare books. For years, Heywood’s shop remained comfortably in California, with the occasional pop-up elsewhere, but earlier this summer Book/Shop officially found an East Coast home at New York’s C.H.C.M. Tucked in the corner of C.H.C.M.’s Bond Street store, the Book/Shop permanent pop-up will feature a rotating selection of art books, as well as hard-to-find texts of all sorts. These books were no doubt picked as much for their design as for their subject matter, and their arresting covers are the perfect compliment to C.H.C.M.’s sharp space.

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Remembering The Golden Age of the American Airport

Sep 26th, 2014 | Categories: Americana, History, Travel | by Jake Gallagher

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At this point, modern air travel is so unpleasant, so inconveniencing, so downright annoying that talking about it almost seems pointless, like shouting into a jet engine. If there is one positive to be extracted from all of our collective airline agony, it’s that it forces us to reflect upon a time when air travel was not only enjoyable, but dare I say, sexy. Shows like Mad Men, and movies like Catch Me if You Can play into our rosy-eyed curiosity with mid-century air travel, portraying well-heeled passengers, sociable stewardesses, and those beautiful modernist concourses. Airports of today are drab reminders of just how far you are from home, but in the early decades of air travel these buildings were sleek, shiny shrines to the future. The terminals that serviced America’s larger cities at this time were designed to not only help carry passengers from point A to point B, but also to reflect the progressive spirit of commercial air travel, which had really only taken off (no pun intended) in 1958 with the advent of the Boeing 707. So buckle up, make sure your seat backs and tray tables are in their full upright position, and travel back in time with us to the golden age of the American airport.





Spanning the Map with Battenwear SS ’15

Sep 25th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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On the left side of the Battenwear showroom hangs a vintage elementary school map of the United States, with each adjoining state painted in a different shade. You might recall a hanging such as this from your childhood days behind the desk, but in Battenwear’s showroom the map appears less like an educational artifact and more like a representative collage of America’s distinct yet interconnected territories. I tend to think of Battenwear in similar terms, as a brand that revels in the open flow of American style while celebrating regional quirks.

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Frisco Ivy | Beams Plus A/W ’14

Sep 24th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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“Go west, young man.”

In 1851 John Babsone Lane Soule coined this phrase in reference to the “Manifest Destiny” seekers of the mid-nineteenth century, but his words were still ringing out over a century later as America’s hippified denizens made the pilgrimage to San Francisco. From the Gold Rush onward, San Francisco had been a proverbial land of opportunity for this country’s itinerant masses, a place for like-minded misfits to come together and find acceptance. While this atmosphere has now unfortunately spawned the monoculture of Silicon Valley, the vibrant and volatile spirit of the sixties still burns on.





Nau x Snow Peak | Portland Meets Tokyo.

Sep 24th, 2014 | Categories: Portland Oregon, Sponsored Post | by Michael Williams

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Portland, Oregon has benefited tremendously from its proximity to the great outdoors of the Pacific Northwest and the vast supply of creative minds who call Rip City home. That must be why the city can boast such an amazing group of outfitters who make clothing and gear there, Nau and Snow Peak among them. While Nau works to infuse function into our everyday lives with a subtleness very rarely seen, Snow Peak has done its best to gear-up every well-to-do camper around with everything from stoves to titanium sporks — an invention which has taken the tiny details to new heights. Recently these two cross-town brands have come together to create a range of clothing which embodies Nau’s love for subtle yet functional design and Snow Peak’s fixation with the little details. The capsule collection was created to seamlessly move with you from your everyday life to places far and near. Nau’s GM Mark Galbraith said it best. “The ‘Portland meets Tokyo’ concept we’ve developed stays true to each brand’s heritage, while giving opportunity to demonstrate a refined modern outdoor aesthetic we both value.”

The collection is heavily influenced by Japanese aesthetics and the importance of both function and mobility. The collection (which consists of both mens and womens clothing and outerwear) is centered on several key pieces including the Checkmate shirt (with easily-accessible and understated zip pockets), the Felt Over Sweater (A fine micron New Zealand merino wool pullover that has been felted to be almost impervious to the wind), the Welter Motil Pant (hidden cell pocket and all) and lastly the breathable but water shielding Hokkadio jacket.

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The Grey Crewneck | Essentially Essential

Sep 23rd, 2014 | Categories: Americana, Fall, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

On the set of Sometimes a Great Notion

Here at ACL, we prefer recommendations to requisites. The term essentials, as we’ve waxed on before, is criminally overused these days, and so we try to adhere to the rule that nothing we cover is so vital that everyone positively must own it.

Except in this case.

Everyone, regardless of gender, regardless of age, regardless of style, could use a grey crewneck sweatshirt. Over, under, up, down, across, through, no matter how you may wear it a grey crewneck is, dare we say it, yes, an essential.





The Escape Artist | Dennis Hopper in Taos.

Sep 21st, 2014 | Categories: Americana, History, Jake Gallagher, Movies | by Jake Gallagher

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It’s become a standard Hollywood story: an actor gets burnt out by the scene and decides that they need to get out of L.A. for a little. They disappear to Marfa, or Capri, or Burning Man only to make a public re-immersion a month or so later, capped off by an interview about how “refreshing” their sabbatical was. Even vacations are punctuated by press releases these days.

The roots of these restorative respites can be traced back to Dennis Hopper, who in 1970 decamped to Taos, New Mexico. Unlike his contemporaries Hopper was driven not by his public image, but by a genuine desire to escape. After fifteen years on the silver screen – beginning with Rebel Without a Cause and concluding with his period-defining masterpiece, Easy Rider, Hopper was in need of a change of scenery. When he had arrived in Hollywood in 1955, he was a straight-laced, baby-faced kid that hadn’t even reached his twentieth birthday yet. In his polo shirts, traddy suits, and slim ties, Hopper had the clean-cut look that execs were looking for, but unfortunately, so did countless other young actors just like him.

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