A Continuous Lean. - Page 4

A Lesson on Structure from Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

Aug 7th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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If you ask anyone that’s even tangentially connected to the clothing world about how a man should go about dressing better, they will almost certainly tell you that one of the first steps is “finding the right fit.” This oft quoted phrase is a concise way of stating that all men must determine what works for them and what does not. This is surely a personal matter, but it also raises a quandary for some men – after all, how does a man find his right fit, if he himself is not so fit. From runway shots, to campaign ads, to e-comm imagery, right down to the in-store mannequins, the majority of men that we see as the template for how to wear clothing today are svelte, if not unrealistic in shape. And yet, most of our are not graced with the lithe physique of a model, so it’s worth asking, where are the real(istic) men?

That answer to this conundrum, lies in the past. Ernest Hemingway, Fatty Arbuckle, Alfred Hitchcock, Marlon Brando (the later years) these were all men of substance in every sense, and yet their added girth never interfered with their status as icons. Amongst these heftier legends, German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe stands out, not merely for his designs, but for his dress.





A Conversation with Scott Sternberg of Band of Outsiders.

Aug 6th, 2014 | Categories: A Conversation With, Jake Gallagher, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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On the afternoon that I arrive to interview Scott Sternberg at the Band of Outsiders New York offices, the racks at the back of the showroom are almost entirely empty. Last season has already been shipped off and the next collection is yet to take its place, and this transitional state speaks well to the spirit of BoO. In the ten years since he founded Band, Sternberg has never stopped moving and reshaping his L.A. based label. Along the way, he has racked up countless accolades, started a women’s business that’s equally as robust, married modern menswear with movie stars, and continuously redefined what prep means in this day and age. As Band embarks on their second decade, Sternberg has his foot squarely on the gas as evidenced by the soon-to-open New York store, which will be their first flagship here in the states. We sat down with Sternberg to discuss the plans for this store, the meaning of prep, the L.A., New York divide, Starbucks, and even economics.

ACL: This January marked ten years of Band of Outsiders, what has changed in that time? Both from your personal viewpoint as well as how the brand is now formulated?

Scott Sternberg: Essentially it’s the same through-line since the idea of Band of Outsiders, even before it was called Band of Outsiders came up. This idea of being the future of American prep, this sort of modern American preppy uniform and system of dressing. I think what’s different is that I make women’s clothes and through the process of doing that and learning how to do that, which was self taught, I became more interested in different ways of pushing things a little further, beyond just making a great suit, a great tie, and a great shirt. And that’s all within a pretty strict bubble of wearability still. Whether that’s graphics, fabric development, certain construction tricks, any of that stuff, over the years I’ve just gotten more playful and inventive with the clothes, but essentially it’s the same system of dressing. Hopefully I’m getting better at what I’m doing. *laughs*

Through the years we also started making products as objects to also styling those in the looks and then creating a narrative out of what those looks are, for a fashion show, for a look book, for a Polaroid campaign. So there’s this whole layer of imagery that sits on top of the product that again, same message, same thing: prep, American, humor, levity, all that stuff. So yea, boring old me, same old thing.





Orcival | Breton Stripes Done Right

Aug 5th, 2014 | Categories: France, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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Americans have blue jeans, the French have Breton stripes.

No item is more fundamental to French style than the blue and white striped shirt, and there’s certainly no shortage of them to go around. The appeal of a Breton tee is simple, they’re tailored through the body with an open “boat-neck,” but relaxed in the sleeve and are generally one of the most comfortable garments you can wear. It’s often the most basic items that are the easiest to screw up though and there are countless “close but no cigar” iterations of the Breton tee out there. Which brings us to Orcival, the seventy-five year old purveyors of an authentic Breton stripe tee.

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Drake’s Autumn Winter ’14 | Tried and True

Aug 4th, 2014 | Categories: England, Jake Gallagher, London, Made in England, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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Lookbooks are not really about clothing anymore.

They can be focused on a brand’s attitude, their surroundings, their friends, their favorite beer, maybe their favorite plant, but what they rarely provide is insight on how to actually wear the clothes. All that posturing, all that ambiance, all that hyper specific styling rarely translates into something that you can actually wear. Not so with Drake’s London though, their Autumn Winter ’14 lookbook not only conveys the brand’s style, but it’s actually an asset to their audience.





Required Viewing | The Battered Bastards of Baseball

Aug 1st, 2014 | Categories: ACL Films, History, Jake Gallagher | by Jake Gallagher

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Hey, remember when sports were fun? You know, back before we started obsessing over trade deadlines, bloated contract deals, and whiny star players? It’s easy to forget that athletics were once valued above business, but fortunately this past month Netflix debuted The Battered Bastards of Baseball, a documentary that both makes you love Bing Russell and also reminds us a time when having fun was more important than making the big bucks.





The New Everything | Converse Jack Purcell Cross Stitch.

Aug 1st, 2014 | Categories: Footwear, Sponsored Post | by Michael Williams

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If you plotted out footwear styles from the past few years on a Venn Diagram, you would find the relationship between sneakers and dress shoes has become more and more involved. Not long ago, brogues, saddle shoes, bucks, longings and cap-toes were everywhere. Then dress shoes and sneakers started to merge together into what many saw as the best of both worlds. Things seemed to be led by the menswear magazines, Pitti street style and comfort-loving guys everywhere. It seemed perfectly normal to wear sneakers with a suit. More than that, it felt stylish and right. Then boom, this past month Alex Williams in The New York Times declared sneakers the new black. Sneakers are the new dress shoe and, as it happens, sneakers are the new everything. To further prove that they look good with (almost) anything, I recently spent a few days in NYC wearing the new Converse Jack Purcell Cross Stitch collection all over town.

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Boerum House & Home | The Shoppable Showroom

Jul 31st, 2014 | Categories: Brooklyn, Design, Jake Gallagher, Men's Stores, New York City, Shopping | by Jake Gallagher

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Boerum‘s address reads 314 Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, but this is not the Brooklyn we’ve all come to expect. In fact the space doesn’t really feel like anywhere else in this city, but what it does feel like is a quintessential Partners & Spade production. The progressive downtown design firm, which is responsible for everything from Target ads to Sleepy Jones, was tapped by Flank, a boutique Manhattan-based architecture firm to create Boerum House & Home, so named for its Boerum Hill neighborhood.

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