A Continuous Lean. - Page 3

Why We Should All Respect Hiroshi Fujiwara.

Feb 8th, 2015 | Categories: Design, Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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Hiroshi Fujiwara has a resume that most designers could only dream of. In his thirty-plus year career the Fragment Design founder has worked with Nike, Starbucks, Stussy, Neighborhood, Casio, Carhartt, Beats, and Disney. Oh wait, did I say in his career? Because that was just in the past year. Pull back a bit further and you’ll find names like Oakley, Cole Haan, Clarks, Sacai, Visvim, Sophnet, Converse, Levi’s, and Martin Guitar. And that’s just his work as a designer. Fujiwara is also an accomplished musician who has collaborated with Janis Ian and Eric Clapton. Oh, and if that’s not impressive enough he appeared in Lost in Translation.





A Victory for American Made Sneakers.

Feb 5th, 2015 | Categories: Footwear, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

Victory

Victory Sportswear might just be the most important new sneaker brand out there, but there’s actually nothing new about them. We had never heard of Victory until we spotted them at this year’s Capsule trade show, but we were immediately taken by the brand’s suede and mesh trainers which look like a cross between something Carl Lewis might’ve worn at the ’84 Olympics and a pair of sneakers you might find at an orthopedic store.

Truthfully though, it wasn’t the look of the shoes that got us excited, but rather the fact that they were made in America. The only other brand making shoes in America right now is New Balance, and just like them, Victory produces their sneakers in New England (NB in Maine, Victory in Massachusetts). In fact, Victory has made its entire collection in its Massachusetts factory since the company was founded in 1980′s. The question is, where has it been this whole time? And how are we not surprised that it was Daiki and the Engineered Garments team that has unearthed them for our collective pleasure.





The Polo Bar | A Fifth Ave Time Capsule

Feb 3rd, 2015 | Categories: Drinking, Food, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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“There’s no photos allowed, sir.” At first I’m insulted, and then I realize that I’m the one that has crossed the line. Of course, there wouldn’t be photos allowed at The Polo Bar. Not because the restaurant has anything to hide, but because the mere sight of a cell phone might upset the meticulous atmosphere at Ralph Lauren’s time warp in the form of a Fifth Avenue dining room.

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SIGNALS

Feb 2nd, 2015 | Categories: SIGNALS | by Michael Williams

  • Neil Degrasse Tyson explains the interesting story of his most re-tweeted tweet. [Facebook]
  • Budweiser thumbs its nose with the “macro beer” Super Bowl ad. [Pictured]
  • 25 classic New York restaurants. Eat at every one of these before they disappear. [Eater]
  • Becoming a better man, (thirty) one day(s) at a time. [Valet]
  • Behold Rancourt’s handsome new Horween veg tanned capsule collection. [Rancourt & Co.]

—Good things happening elsewhere. Follow along with ACL on Facebook and Instagram





Shopping Mill Valley | Guideboat Co.

Jan 29th, 2015 | Categories: Made in the USA, Retail, San Francisco | by Michael Williams

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A few months back while visiting San Francisco I met up with Tellason founders Tony Patella and Pete Searson. I’ve known those guys since 2009 when I first interviewed them for ACL and over the course of a few years we’ve become friends. As Tony and Pete are good guys who know a lot about what’s going on, I do my best to connect with them whenever I visit the Bay Area. When we met up for breakfast we spoke about Oakland amongst other things, and I told Pete and Tony how I have been hearing a lot about the city and how I was keen to check it out. They suggested a few places that they thought were interesting and I made a plan to spend the day out in the East Bay. We finished up our coffee and right before I was about to depart Pete mentioned a new shop out in his hometown of Mill Valley. “Oh yeah, you’re going to love this place.” Pete said. After checking things out in Oakland for most of the day I headed for my last stop of the day in Marin. And that’s the story of how I discovered something new in Mill Valley and how I came to love the Guideboat Company.

Inspired by a childhood in the Adirondacks, Stephen Gordon founded Guideboat Co. to be an amazing collection of well-made and long lasting things loosely organized around collection of boats and a nautical theme. The beautiful new store occupies a historic old saw mill which helped give this affluent North Bay town it’s name. It’s the perfect use for the long mothballed site that many in Mill Valley had worried would not be preserved. While it could certainly be considered off the beaten path for a flagship store, Guideboat is an enthralling retail showcase for this ambitious new endeavor. Though this isn’t the first retail launch for Gordon. Way back in 1979 he founded another little company you may know called Restoration Hardware. Guideboat’s other founder Chad Hurley is also no stranger to success himself, having co-founded YouTube. After spending a few hours in the shop in Mill Valley, I’d say these serial entrepreneurs are on to something.

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A Campaign to Save the Disappearing Diner.

Jan 28th, 2015 | Categories: Brooklyn, Food, Important Shit, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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“Don’t it always seem to go, that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.”

It’s been forty-five years since Joni Mitchell first sang that fateful line on her hit track Big Yellow Taxi, but her words continue to ring out to this day. That line has been repeated, and repeated, and repeated over the years but for as straightforward as her sentiment may be, we’re still struggling to grasp the song’s message. This is especially true here in New York, where more and more so-called institutions of the city seem to be disappearing by the day. And no industry seems to be both more at risk, and more revered than restaurants.

At this point, it seems as if any restaurant that’s been around for more than five years, doesn’t serve some blogger approved, Instagram-ready menu of avant garde delicacies, and/or hasn’t found their niche food fad yet, is endanger of shuttering at a moments notice. And in turn, each “we’re closing” announcement is met by a chorus of complaints, and groans, and claims that New York is over. Inevitably though a week passes, and we all forget about it. We bounce back to whatever “hot new restaurant” is peaking that week, or to our favorite dollar slice spot, depending on our particular palette preferences. And honestly, when was the last time any of us ate at Soup Burg, or Cafe Edison, or El Greco or Odessa?





A Whale of a Boat.

Jan 23rd, 2015 | Categories: Americana, Jake Gallagher, Obsessions, Outdoors | by Jake Gallagher

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On a recent episode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, Jerry Seinfeld rolled around Montauk while interviewing Jimmy Fallon. The episode featured a whole lot of star power for one small web short (not to mention one very tiny car) but both celebrities still managed to get upstaged by the unlikeliest of cameos – a boat. But, not just any boat, a thirteen foot Boston Whaler which Seinfeld proudly called, “the greatest boat in the world.” For as hyperbolic as that may sound, Seinfeld’s claim is one-upped by an even bolder statement from the Boston Whaler company itself – that their boats are “unsinkable legends.”