A Continuous Lean. - Page 3

Kyoto in NoHo.

Apr 21st, 2015 | Categories: Retail, Shopping | by ACL Editors

Nalata

It’s a fine line between particular and pretentious.

To be particular is admirable. It is to be studied, meticulous, and exacting, but in a way that entices people, rather than repels them. Pretension on the other hand is hardly worth dwelling upon. We all just know it when we see it, and then do our best to avoid it at all costs. This balance can be tricky though. If you appear finicky, it can seem ostentatious, rather than interesting.

Nalata Nalata epitomizes the right level of balance. The tranquil home goods shop, (located on Extra Place just off the Bowery by way of Canada), is certainly fastidious, but it is also welcoming, and in many ways even enlightening. Walk around the small shop and you could easily mistake your Noho surroundings for Kyoto, where stores so often feel like more like museums than retail spaces.

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SIGNALS

Apr 20th, 2015 | Categories: SIGNALS | by Michael Williams

  • Aether Apparel goes inside the incredible world of Icon trucks. [Aether] [Pictured]
  • L.A.’s most Iconic burgers. Who’s hitting Bill’s in Sherman Oaks with me? [Eater]
  • The complete footage of The Last Waltz. [YouTube h/t Matt K.]
  • Chloe Sevigny in all of her glory. [Maxim]
  • The famous Joseph Mitchell’s story of McSorley’s. [The New Yorker]

—Good things happening elsewhere. Follow along with ACL on Facebook and Instagram

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A Noisy Process for Some Quiet Products.

Apr 14th, 2015 | Categories: Accessories, Made in New York, Menswear | by ACL Editors

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If you stand underneath the Williamsburg Bridge on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn, you’ll immediately notice the thundering clang of the subway overhead. But, if you listen real carefully in between the passing of the cars, you also might hear another noise – the steady symphony emitting from Maximum Henry’s South Williamsburg studio. The care that Henry puts into the products which bear his name can be heard in each drop of the hammer, snip from a pair of sheers, or whirr of the sewing machine. Since founding his eponymous label in 2010, Henry has always done things the hard way. Be it a belt, a bag, or a bifold, Henry has a direct hand in each step of the production process. Nonetheless, Henry has managed to grow his brand considerably over the past five years, and his collection now not only includes the aforementioned leather goods, but also guitar straps, gold cuffs, and cardholders.

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SIGNALS

Apr 13th, 2015 | Categories: SIGNALS | by Michael Williams

J.Crew Chinos

  • An ode to the classic Coleman cooler. [WSJ Off Duty]
  • Italian American. Lardini lands stateside at Club Monaco. [Bloomberg Pursuits]
  • What goes into making the most iconic piece of American clothing. [Valet]
  • Tiffany & Co. retooled their watch line-up with some handsome new pieces. [Forbes]
  • Here’s why J.Crew’s top secret chinos are so special. [Hello J.Crew] [Pictured]

Bonus: 38 must try New York City restaurants. [Eater]

—Good things happening elsewhere. Follow along with ACL on Facebook and Instagram





Checking In | Vahine Island

Apr 9th, 2015 | Categories: Checking In, Travel | by Michael Williams

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Living in New York City, you can take a cab to JFK and in four hours be sitting on a beautiful Caribbean island enjoying the warmth and relaxation that the city has deprived you of. The fact that this option is right in New York’s backyard left me feeling sort of ambivalent about traveling halfway around the world to a place like Tahiti which seemingly offered what we already had such ready access too.

I have to admit when I am wrong, because I have absolutely never been to a more visually stunning place than French Polynesia. On top of that it’s going to be difficult to find a resort more enjoyable than the Vahine Island.

To get to Vahine you need to fly to Tahiti’s capital of Papeete (we flew Air Tahiti Nui from Los Angeles which was a red-eye which happens to be long enough to actually get some rest; Air France flies to PPT as well) and then hopped on a quick intra-island flight to Raiatea. From there the resort stands a short 30 minute boat ride away. Once you step off that boat onto Vahine looking at the blue waters and bright sun, all is right in the world.

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The Masters: Maintaining the Mystique.

Apr 8th, 2015 | Categories: David Coggins, Golf | by David Coggins

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Baseball and Negronis are gifts that arrive with spring and keep on giving all summer long. The Masters, on the other hand, enters our lives and just as quickly departs, leaving us with just the sound of Jim Nantz’s ingratiating voice echoing in our ears. Brace yourself for the tinkling of the piano keys—the familiar theme is written by a certain Dave Loggins (which I really wish was my pen name).

Yes, bless us all, tomorrow the Masters is back.

If you think the reverential tone of the announcers is just for show recall that Gary McCord once told the television audience the putting greens were so fast they seemed “bikini waxed.” That was it for Gary—he was not given a mulligan—he was simply not asked back, cast into vulgar metaphor purgatory. You don’t mess with the Masters.

It casts its hold on many of us who are not golfers or even, for that matter, really golf fans. What captivates us with the fervor usually reserved for Beyoncé acolytes? Well, the atmosphere, singular course and remarkable drama all create, as they say, “a tradition unlike any other.” Think of the Masters as a natural high that oscillates between low key whispering and acute drama.

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Arnold Palmer considers his options.





An Ode to the Humble American Beer.

Apr 7th, 2015 | Categories: Drinking, History | by Michael Williams

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The calendar is filled with a host of events like “National Donut Day” and the like that seem to be conjured from thin air with little basis in the real world. The amount of these little celebratory days tends to amuse me greatly. So when I heard the story of “National Beer Day” I was immediately skeptical that this was yet another greeting card holiday. When I learned the actual history of today, April 7th, National Beer Day, a new found respect emerged for this humble beer drinking day’s place in our history. And let’s be honest, it doesn’t take much to motivate me to grab a cold one.

The significance of this national day of beer emerged following the dry days of prohibition in 1933. As it turns out, the date of April 7th is the day that the Cullen–Harrison Act went into effect for the first time, and marked the day in which a thirsty public could once again legally consume a beer without fear of incident from the authorities.