Travel | A Continuous Lean. - Page 3

Checking In | Viceroy Riviera Maya

Apr 18th, 2012 | Categories: Checking In, Travel | by Michael Williams

The ultimate vacation, for me, is the tropical getaway. I travel quite a bit for work, and love seeing new places, but rarely do I block five days and relax on a beach. That’s exactly what I did this past week. My girlfriend and I (she’s responsible for a few pictures here too, so you know) headed to Mexico to fully ensconce ourselves in the blood pressure lowering confines of the Viceroy Riviera Maya.

The resort is set up as a series of villas, tucked into a heavily forested part of the Mexican coastline. It’s like a well appointed Spanish speaking version of Swiss Family Robinson with an emphasis on delicious food and super attentive service. Everywhere you turn there’s a very pleasant Viceroy staffer happily willing to help get you a towel, clean your sunglasses or help you with anything you could possibly need. And it’s not crowded — and that is key. While we were on the property, we barely saw more than four or five guests. No lines for anything, ever. No trouble getting your preferred cabaña on the beach, no waiting for a table at one of the restaurants. Coming from the insanity of the city, this was crucial to the relaxation factor. We needed waves, sun and a salty breeze, not lots of people.





Pachyderm Proof | Greg Chapman for Globe-Trotter

Apr 2nd, 2012 | Categories: England, Made in England, Travel | by Michael Williams

Americana loving Brit designer Greg Chapman spent a year and a half traveling around the world with the Globe-Trotter Safari Air, a case that he purchased at the revered company’s shop in London’s Burlington Arcade after a meeting with brand Creative Director Gary Bott. A little while later, Chapman approached Globe-Trotter and Bott about collaborating on a modified case that incorporates some modern day considerations — though nothing too crazy like wheels — and then set out to create a small run of special edition Globe-Trotters based on the company’s functional 1912 Stabilist series.

More history on the inspiration for the Greg Chapman x Globe-Trotter collaboration:

In 1912, the Stabilist series were bespoke manufactured Globe-Trotter luggage that featured special functionality for the Victorian traveler; such as wardrobe trunks, hat and shoe cases for travel by horse drawn carriage, rail and cruise liner.





Becoming a Globe-Trotter

Jan 6th, 2012 | Categories: England, Travel | by Michael Williams

Still made in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire England using original manufacturing methods, Globe-Trotter luggage has over the years built a cult following among well heeled travelers the world over. The process of making these incredible instruments of exploration has largely remained the same for over a hundred years — something not too many luggage makers can boast (though there are still a handful who can).

The company recently released a video highlighting the making of its iconic cases. More on that construction process from the Globe-Trotter craftsmanship page:

Each case is uniquely constructed from vulcanised fibreboard; a special material invented in Britain during the 1850’s consisting of multiple layers of bonded paper. Handles are produced by the leather team who also form the iconic Globe-Trotter corners over a period of 5-days on antique Victorian presses.





Escape to Carneros.

Jan 1st, 2012 | Categories: California, Travel | by Michael Williams

Without a doubt the most relaxing and enjoyable days of 2011 were spent within the beautiful confines of The Carneros Inn. A group of friends and I spent the weekend at the Northern California resort this past fall — an experience I can’t seem to let go of. Having never been to the Napa Valley, the time at Carneros was the perfect introduction to one of the most amazing places in North America. Honestly, I’m disappointed I haven’t visited sooner in life.





The Layover

Dec 28th, 2011 | Categories: Food, Travel, Video | by Michael Williams

SINGAPORE

I spent a lot of time flying around this year — my frequent flyer account tells me 127,000 miles flown ytd — and the one thing that makes me not regret all those hours spent on planes next to a bunch of C.O.S. is all of the time I was lucky enough to spend experiencing a bunch of different cultures and cuisines. It’s easy to say that no time was more enjoyable than my exploration of Italy with my good friend Courtney, who has been the most amazing guide to all things good in not only Italy, but in life.

With it being the end of the year, I’m guessing that everyone is either on a beach, a ski slope or killing time (at home or work) on the internets. So I figured it would be a good time to think about the places and adventures that will shape 2012. This idea came to me recently while watching every episode of Anthony Bourdain’s food / travel show The Layover. I missed all of these shows when they originally aired (because I don’t really have any time to watch teevee), but thankfully all of the shows are available online and for me to share with you here.





London Airport – Heathrow

Sep 4th, 2011 | Categories: Travel, Video | by Michael Williams

It wasn’t until after WWII that London Airport – Heathrow began to take shape as a major transit hub for London. In 1946 Heathrow was just a small privately owned grass-airfield with little if any infrastructure and no real terminals. Actually, in 1946 when Ministry of Civil Aviation took over the site they erected a tent as the first terminal structure (no word what the departures lounge amenities were like). With the expected growth of post-war air travel London needed a facility that could expand with the demand; at the time the partially built Heathrow site was ideal. More than sixty years later and Heathrow is the busiest airport in Europe and one of largest in the world.





No sleep till Berlin.

Jul 13th, 2011 | Categories: Berlin, Travel | by Michael Williams

If you haven’t ever been to Berlin (or haven’t been in a some while), then you need to do yourself a favor and visit. The city has gone through such a dramatic transformation and development over the past few years, it is remarkable. The city also has an energy that, to me, is unmatched on the Continent. The food is good, the museums are good, the style is good, and the place is semi-affordable (even with the Dollar exchange pain that we Americans are used to).

I had the pleasure of spending last week in the expansive German city and below are some of the sights from my trip. In addition to what you see here (and a substantial bit of these photos have been appearing on my Instagram @acontinuouslean), I also visited a few shops and will report more on that shortly. If Europe is in your future travel plans, be sure to spend some time in Berlin, you won’t be sorry.