Style | A Continuous Lean.

Pleat It Forward

Mar 17th, 2015 | Categories: Menswear, Style | by ACL Editors

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George Carlin had his famous “seven dirty words,” but in menswear we really have just one: pleats. At a time when even sweatpants have become stylish, nothing says, “I’ve given up” quite like a pair of pleated pants. They’re the uniform for the uninformed, pants for men who dress literally and figuratively in the dark.

During the “great menswear enlightenment” of the mid-aughts, pleats came to represent all that was wrong with the average male wardrobe. Flat fronted pants weren’t just a more streamlined option, they were the only option for those that were in the know. Men that wore pleats didn’t realize, or worse didn’t care, that that their bloated trousers looked terrible. The general assumption became that if you wore pleated pants, you just didn’t get it. And no man ever wants to be accused of that.

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Fuck Yeah Andy Spade.

Feb 25th, 2015 | Categories: Style | by Michael Williams

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Yesterday I discovered Fuck Yeah Andy Spade while surfing around on the internets. I have to say that it made my week. In the process of discovering this site I was reminded that Andy = God. Also, the man has amazing taste (he’s the king of Dad’s Style after all) and is above all things consistent.

In a world where everything is thrown out every season for the new trend du jour, Andy has stuck to his Brooks Brothers OCBD wearing guns. For that (and many other reasons) I admire him immensely. While I don’t think I will ever be as prep focused as Andy (and I’m certainly not a Pepsi man), I give him a lot of credit for advancing the cause of American menswear everywhere. Fuck yeah Andy Spade.

KARLIE KLOSS x WARBY PARKER Collaboration Launch Dinner

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A True People’s Champ.

Feb 24th, 2015 | Categories: History, Menswear, Sports, Style | by ACL Editors

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In the ring Muhammed Ali was a monster. He would grab hold of each match, dancing his way around the ring until just the right moment and then BAM, his fist, as big as a loaf of bread and as weighty as Thor’s hammer, would shoot forth so as to inflict the maximum amount of damage upon his adversary.

Despite his brutal blows, Ali was not fueled by anger. Fighting was his job, and he was damn well good at it. But outside the ring, he was known for his big personality – a man who could be caring and controversial in equal measure. Never one to hold back, Ali would often play to the camera, as seen in his famous Esquire cover and photo shoot with The Beatles. He was also a pretty sharp dresser, especially for a guy of his size. Ali wasn’t so much a gentle giant, as he was a giant gentleman, which is why his battle with Parkinson’s disease, and his subsequent deteriorating state later in life, has been so painful to watch. And so it’s best to remember Ali as he was in his glorious heyday – as the true people’s champ.

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Not So Standard.

Feb 11th, 2015 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear, Shopping, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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For many Japanese brands, it’s not enough to only have one line. Companies like Beams, Ships, and United Arrows love to stack up sub-brands and diffusion lines like a hastily made parfait of complementary aesthetics, which each layer bleeding over into the offer. The differences between two given brands under the same umbrella can often be tough to discern – one might be workwear-meets-streetwear, while the other might be streetwear-meets-workwear. It all tends to get lost in translation. Fortunately for Western audiences though, Japanese brands are also known for being masters of visual merchandising. Often times each label will get it’s own lookbook or ad campaign, which is (in most cases) the closest that we’ll ever come to actually interacting with these brands, as many of them are not widely available outside of Japan. This no longer rings as true for Beams and United Arrows, which have recently upped their American and European stockists, but it is still quite true for Journal Standard, another multi-label Japanese brand.

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The Turtleneck Comes Back Out of Its Shell.

Jan 15th, 2015 | Categories: Hollywood, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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If imitation is the highest form of flattery, than we’re a pretty flattering bunch. Even in 2014, decades after their respective primes (and in many cases, decades after their deaths) it’s still the icons – the McQueens, the Redford’s, the Newman’s, the Caine’s, et al. that we look to for our sartorial cues. It’s these erstwhile icons that we return to time and time again when we’re citing everything from sneakers to suits to smirking glances. The cause and effect(s) of our rear-view vision are a topic for another time (don’t want to exhaust our bandwidth for this month too soon) but what’s most curious about this backwards perspective is the way in which certain venerable trends rise while others sink like a remake of Alfie.

What is it about bucket hats, shawl collar sweaters, and three-roll-two jackets that made them so popular, while ascots, cowboy hats, and spectator shoes never really caught on again? Sure, there’s the simple fact that most successfully resurrected styles are easy to wear, while those that remain in the past would be considered a bit too ostentatious for contemporary wear. But, what about the turtleneck then?

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The Surprisingly Stylish Side of Hugh Hefner.

Oct 13th, 2014 | Categories: Americana, History, Jake Gallagher, Magazines, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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Hugh Hefner is one of those rare individuals that appears to exist in a universe all his own. Sure, there’s the physical “universe” of the Mansion, the Bunnies, and the never-ending party that is Playboy, but there’s also something much deeper. Hefner has made a career out of the sort of images that you wouldn’t want your boss, girlfriend, mother, or fellow straphanger to catch you looking at, and yet, Hef still manages to come across as a gentleman at every turn. Of course, there is something slightly off about a nearly-ninety year old man that wears robes in public and is married to a women sixty years his junior, which is why we prefer to remember Hef for his younger, more presentable years.

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The Surfers Wore Short Sleeves | The Beach Boys

Aug 26th, 2014 | Categories: Americana, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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The Beach Boys first three albums all contained the word “surf,” in them, and yet oddly enough of the original five members, Dennis Wilson was the only one that actually surfed. The fact that The Beach Boys were more likely to ride the airwaves than actual waves did little to hurt their image though, and from the moment “Surfin’ Safari” hit stores in 1962 they became America’s shaggy haired surf riding celebrities. Aside from their album titles, and the countless surf-centric photo shoots during their early years, The Beach Boys also wisely favored a wardrobe that was unmistakably coastal. To really dial in their sea seasoned image they dressed in terry cloth polos, cropped khakis, plaid overshirts, floral trunks, and most importantly short sleeve shirts.

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