Style | A Continuous Lean.

Get Yourself a Guayabera

Jul 23rd, 2014 | Categories: ACL Endorses, Jake Gallagher, Shirts, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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Ankle espadrilles, madras short shorts, and more compartments than a Boeing 747, oh yes there is quite a lot going on with Gary Cooper’s outfit in the photo above, but for now let’s all shift our attention over to John Wayne’s more approachable attire.

While that cowboy hat probably deserves a post all its own, Wayne’s Guayabera shirt is the real winner of this shot. When this photo was snapped back in Acapulco during the forties, Guayabera’s were ubiquitous throughout Mexico, but it’s tough to discern where exactly they come from. The most popular origin story is that sometime in the late 18th or early 19th centuries a farmer’s wife sewed four pleated pockets onto the front of his shirt so that he could easily store guavas (hence the name) while out in the fields. Whether that’s true or not, no one really knows, but the Guayabera’s merits are without question.





Arnold Palmer | The Swinging King of the Polo

Jul 20th, 2014 | Categories: Americana, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Sports, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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With seven major golf championships, a Presidential Medal of Freedom, a spot in the PGA Hall of Fame, and one helluva refreshing beverage to his name Arnold Palmer has racked up quite the cache of accolades in his day, but we think he’s deserving of just one more – The King of the Polo Shirt. During his dominating run through the professional golf circuit in the late fifties and sixties Palmer was best known for three things: his immaculate swing, his unflappable attitude, and his endless supply of polo shirts.

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The Most Stylish Authors and What You Can Learn From Them.

Jul 7th, 2014 | Categories: Style | by Jake Gallagher

Stylish authors get a bad rap. Unlike their cinematic or musical counterparts, authors are not fortunate enough to have their likenesses plastered on giant posters, television screens, and print ads. Therefore, authors are often left out of the conversation when it comes to the greats of style. Of course there are exceptions to this rule (and you’ll see a few of them below) but by and large, the sartorial merits of authors often go unnoticed. Therefore, in honor of those that have a way with words and wardrobes alike, we give you the best dressed authors of all time.

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S.J. Perelman - Humorist, traveler, all around eccentric.

What you can learn from his style - While his style was relatively reserved, Perelman’s glasses prove that a little bit of shape can go a long way.

Required Reading - Westward Ha! (1948)





In Defense of the Shirt Monogram.

Jun 24th, 2014 | Categories: American Psycho, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Shirts, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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The most polarizing word in menswear isn’t even a full word, it’s the three (or maybe two) letters that make up a set of initials. Nothing stirs the pot quite like a good old debate about monograms. Classicists have long labeled them as gauche and ostentatious while their contemporaries counter that they’re one of the rare ways in which a man can truly personalize his everyday attire. We’d venture to say that both sides are correct – yes, monograms are flashy but they’re also highly personal, and can help demarcate not just your shirt but you as a whole.





The Ongoing Power of The Tie.

Jan 31st, 2014 | Categories: David Coggins, Style | by David Coggins

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You’re forgiven if you didn’t realize the Brooklyn Nets were enjoying a bit of a renaissance—they’ve gone a cool 10-2 in January. Apparently, Jason Kidd, in his first season as coach, has become noticeably more relaxed. The New York Times noted yesterday that this goes beyond the team’s play, ‘From an aesthetic standpoint Kidd’s development includes a growing a considerable gray-flecked beard.” We always support beards in leadership roles, even among titans of finance (you can approve the beard and not approve the investment strategy).

The piece continues that in the current winning month Kidd has also forsaken wearing ties during games, and he looks pretty good without one. Still, our first thought was that this was another step down the path of informality—like the sad day when the 21 Club dropped their tie requirement at lunch.





Get Your Hands Dirty | Freemans Sporting Club Fall 2013

Nov 1st, 2013 | Categories: Menswear, Style | by Michael Williams

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The gents at Freemans Sporting Club sent over the first look at its new fall 2013 collection that has just landed in the shop. (Spoiler alert: it’s pretty fucking great.) Over the past several years the line has quietly and steadily grown and slowly taken full control of our closets. (Resistance is futile.) While the product is great all year-long, FSC especially shines in the fall and this offering is certainly proof that good-looking, well-made and considered clothing can take you anywhere — at least until your truck breaks down.





Hardy Amies and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Oct 29th, 2013 | Categories: Film, Jake Gallagher, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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Earlier this fall, Alfonso Cuaron’s space epic Gravity landed on movie screens worldwide, propelling the audience into the final frontier with one of the most renowned cinematic experiences of the past decade. While Gravity, in my opinion, lives up to the hype and then some, it is impossible to watch any sort of intergalactic movie and not think of Stanley Kubrick’s 1967 film 2001: A Space Odyssey. While Gravity from frame one is about the unending solitude of space, 2001 is more concerned with the complexities of space exploration, making it as visually stunning as Gravity, but for different reasons. Gravity’s strength lies in its 3-D shots and extended sequences capturing the incomparable vastness of outer space, while 2001 presents space as more of a futuristic playground, complete with these immense colorful sets and modernist costumes designed by none other than Hardy Amies.

In the late sixties Amies was at the top of his game, guiding his unique eponymous label to become both a traditional Savile Row powerhouse, and a forward thinking fashion brand. It was these two minds that made Amies perfect for the role of costume designer on Kubrick’s film, as 2001 presented both the refined corporate side of space exploration, as well as the more visionary angle of astronauts floating in unchartered territory. Amies essentially developed two separate collections for this film – one of Anglo-fied office ready outfits, and one of avant-garde cosmic costumes.

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