Shoes | A Continuous Lean.

Kicks for a King.

Mar 23rd, 2015 | Categories: Accessories, Menswear, Shoes | by ACL Editors

Slips

It’s said that you can judge a man by his shoes but this goes doubly true for his slippers. In public you’re dignified, distinguished, or at the very least not disheveled. A man’s home is his castle though, and you should look the part. This means dressing like a king. A very comfortable king. Many men these days unfortunately forgo them altogether, but we still believe that slippers are a crucial component of any at home outfit. The power of the slipper lies not in its comfort (it goes without saying that a good pair of slippers should feel like you’re stepping into a cloud) but in the message they send to visitors – You’re in shoes, I’m in slippers, I’m in charge here. So here now are our favorite slippers fit for a king, even if your kingdom is little more than a shoebox studio apartment.





In the Studio | Jack Purcell Signature and Drew Seskunas.

Mar 16th, 2015 | Categories: Shoes, Sponsored Post | by Michael Williams

A well designed object can broaden your understanding of the world. That is the theory that drives Drew Seskunas, co-director of design studio The Principals in his pursuit of object perfection. Much like Jack Purcell, Drew and his partners make beautiful things, create art, design spaces, and use physical objects to connect to people on an emotional level. They seek to expand our understanding of the built realm without abandoning its history.

Their craft combines industrial design, architecture, and occasionally robotics. Whether they’re designing a reactive architectural environment for Bonaroo Music Festival or a flask that not only holds liquid, but looks like liquid for Areaware, they are pushing creativity over convention, and mastering how form can drive function.

Along with Converse Jack Purcell, we step inside Drew’s Brooklyn studio to see how he forms beautiful idea into a beautiful object.

Click the interactive video to learn more about the new Converse Jack Purcell Signature Sneaker.

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Jack Purcell Signature Hits The Street With Mister Mort.

Mar 12th, 2015 | Categories: Shoes, Sponsored Post | by Michael Williams

As an observer of style, Mordechai Rubinstein is seemingly everywhere. No place in the city is safe from his relentless pursuit of the quirky, interesting, the “proper” and most importantly, the stylish. His personal take on clothing varies greatly from the typical person, and he has made name for himself by consistently zigging when everyone else zags. While working at the influential (and now defunct) SoHo shop New Republic in the early aughts Mordechai met Andy Spade who eventually brought him into the fold and helped promote Mordechai’s perspective and his endearing brand of weirdness. During his time with Spade, Rubinstein broke through and made a name for himself by letting his creativity shine and embracing the unconvention in everything. In fact, this concept of creativity over convention is what truly makes Mordehai such a talent in the menswear world.

Along with Jack Purcell, we took to the streets of NYC with Mordechai to get his take on the city — while wearing the iconic Converse Jack Purcell Signature sneaker — which inspires his daily quest for all things interesting and cool. The new Signature Jack Purcell sneaker represents the modern evolution of the iconic silhouette, and you know that if Mordechai is wearing the Jack Purcell it must be good. Because as we’ve seen through his site Mister Mort, Mordecai is someone who takes personal style very seriously. Which is exactly why we love him so much.

Click the interactive video to learn more about the new Jack Purcell.

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An Icon Updated | The New Converse Jack Purcell.

Mar 10th, 2015 | Categories: Shoes, Sponsored Post | by Michael Williams

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The good people at Converse have been hard at work behind the scenes ensuring the Jack Purcell sneakers maintain its icon status well into the future. With a list of design and build updates (18 to be exact), the new Converse Jack Purcell Signature Sneaker has emerged as a new and improved model of the classic we all love. It’s also the most premium expression of the Jack Purcell ever made.

The new Jack Purcell Signature Sneaker is made from a two-ply duck canvas and features a streamlined toecap that creates an updated look, and also a new feel for these familiar sneakers. Plus, there’s an Ortholite footbed with imbedded Nike Zoom Air Technology under the hood that makes for a more comfortable ride. Launched in the past few weeks, the new Jack Purcell Signature Sneaker is offered in Black, Mason and the ever classic White. Perfect for the city, the beach, a bathing suit or a suit suit. These are the iconic sneakers for you and your everyday. [JACK PURCELL]

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A Victory for American Made Sneakers.

Feb 5th, 2015 | Categories: Footwear, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

Victory

Victory Sportswear might just be the most important new sneaker brand out there, but there’s actually nothing new about them. We had never heard of Victory until we spotted them at this year’s Capsule trade show, but we were immediately taken by the brand’s suede and mesh trainers which look like a cross between something Carl Lewis might’ve worn at the ’84 Olympics and a pair of sneakers you might find at an orthopedic store.

Truthfully though, it wasn’t the look of the shoes that got us excited, but rather the fact that they were made in America. The only other brand making shoes in America right now is New Balance, and just like them, Victory produces their sneakers in New England (NB in Maine, Victory in Massachusetts). In fact, Victory has made its entire collection in its Massachusetts factory since the company was founded in 1980′s. The question is, where has it been this whole time? And how are we not surprised that it was Daiki and the Engineered Garments team that has unearthed them for our collective pleasure.





Boots. Just Boots.

Nov 25th, 2014 | Categories: Fall, Footwear, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

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“Pull yourself up by your bootstraps.”

This idiom dates back to the 19th century when men wore tall boots which they had to pull on using loops at the mouth of the boot. Overtime, the phrase came to describe the act of overcoming an obstacle using nothing but your own willpower, and that’s how we still use it today. So, why are we telling you this? Well, boot season is finally upon us here in New York, and instead of blathering on about the merits of a good pair of boots (which we’re sure you’ve heard countless times) we figured why not give you an inane bit of trivia? And, now for something you actually can use, here’s our list of this year’s best boots. Bootstraps not required.





Northampton | The Cradle of Shoe Civilization

Nov 4th, 2014 | Categories: Made in England, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

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“Finishing” is the dirtiest word in high-end footwear. As shoe companies have exported their production to China or Bangladesh or any other country where the production practices are as questionable as the quality of the shoes, many English, Italian, and American brands have begun to exploit a convenient loophole when it comes to marking the country of origin. A shoe might be almost entirely produced overseas, but if it is “finished” in England then that company is free to tack on a “Made in England” label.

What exactly is finishing? Well in some cases it means that the shoe is completed in England – pieces are stitched together, the sole is affixed, etc. but in some cases it means that the shoe was finished and little more than the laces were added in England. Of course, countries have now begun to crack down on this, and it’s not exactly clear how many companies have taken advantage of these loose guidelines, but it’s enough to make savvy shoe-buyers weary. As a result, that “Made in England” tag no longer holds as much weight as it once did. Customers now want greater clarity on the exist origin of their footwear, which has narrowed the scope of “Made in England,” down to one area in particular: Northampton.

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