Outerwear | A Continuous Lean.

Future Fabrics | A Technical Textiles Primer.

Mar 18th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Outerwear | by Jake Gallagher

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There was a time in the not too distant past when all of our clothes were truly organic, created along a clear path from seed to seam. Nowadays though, our textiles are not so much grown by farmers as they are developed by scientists who continuously search for new ways to make our clothes better, faster, and stronger.

This quest to meld textiles and technology has given us a whole new set of fabrics that continuously push the boundaries on what a garment can achieve, and today these cutting-edge materials have become almost commonplace. Performance wear and sportswear designers now share the common goal of crafting garments that not only stand out, but also out last their competitors, and so with these fabrics moving from REI up to Barneys, we figured we’d give you all a primer on some of the biggest names in high-tech textiles.





Herno Steps Into Its Own.

Mar 14th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Made in Italy, Outerwear | by Jake Gallagher

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Herno’s moment in the sun has been a long time coming. Founded in 1948, Herno has been creating some the world’s finest outerwear for over half a century, and yet the brand has remained in relative obscurity until fairly recently. In fact many of you might have even owned an Herno jacket over the years without ever even knowing it. This is all because historically Herno’s main business has been as a private label producer for renowned brands across the world, including the likes of Ralph Lauren, Jil Sander, Armani, Prada, Hermes, and Louis Vuitton.

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Getting Fleeced | The Retro-Tech Revival.

Mar 13th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Outerwear | by Jake Gallagher

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The debut of Patagonia’s Legacy collection last year was not merely a triumph for the Ventura, California based brand, it was definitive proof that the so-called heritage movement isn’t going anywhere. To be fair this is not the work wear centric heritage campaign of the mid aughts, which had men in 2007 dressing like coalminers from 1907, rather this current wave is far less stoic, drawing inspiration from the cheeky outdoor labels of the seventies and eighties. While we’re happy to report that neon headbands and technicolor leggings are still a thing of the past (for now), this movement has sparked a major comeback for one of the greatest “technical” fabrics of all time – fleece.

Developed by Malden Mills (which has now been succeeded by the more marketable Polartec) fleece is warm, waterproof, and clocks in weighing less than terrycloth making it about as cutting edge as it gets for the late seventies. In 1981, thanks to a serendipitous partnership with Yvon Chouinard, the owner of a blossoming mountaineering brand by the name of Patagonia (who is a client of Paul + Williams), Malden Mills creation made it’s way into the outdoor world. Over the next few years fleece trickled down to every mall brand in America and before you knew it, that mystique of innovation had worn off. What was once advertised as an advanced fabric for the ages was now more run of the mill than merino and fleece was delegated to the discount bin.

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Responding to the Rain | Freeman Seattle

Jan 20th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Outerwear, Seattle | by Jake Gallagher

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It rains almost every other day in Seattle, and if trends are any indicator, it’s only going to get worse.

When that threat of rain looms over your head like a Charlie Brown-esque cartoon storm cloud at all times, there’s only two things you can do. You can move, or you can fight back.

The team behind Freeman (no affiliation with New York’s Freeman’s Sporting Club) decided to stand their ground by battling Seattle’s ever-present precipitation with a better raincoat. This meant a jacket that wasn’t just waterproof, but also wouldn’t make someone look like they’re about to scale Kilimanjaro. Sure, a technically advanced jacket might “work,” but it might also be better suited for the ski slopes than a city street.

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Yesterday’s Greatest Golden Bear Collaborations

Jan 17th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Outerwear | by Jake Gallagher

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Born on the bay in 1922, Golden Bear’s original intention was to clothe the dockworkers that labored day and night at the port of San Francisco. Temperatures out near the water used to plummet on those foggy California nights, but those longshoremen still had to get the job done, so Golden Bear’s jackets became their armor, shielding them from the crisp air coming off the sea.

Today, much of Golden Bear’s clientele is less concerned with the jackets utilitarian merits, and more focused on their aesthetic properties, as the varsity jackets and bombers that comprise the brand’s collections have become highly sought after once again. Where Golden Bear truly thrives is in their countless collaborations that they rack up each year. Brands and stores from all over the map make the pilgrimage to California to work in partnership with Golden Bear to create truly unique renditions of the brand’s time-tested outerwear. Last year Golden Bear was particularly busy, and so we decided to round-up its best collaboration collections of recent memory.





The American International Vest.

Nov 6th, 2013 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Outerwear | by Jake Gallagher

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Brass snaps imported from Japan. Horween leather details from Chicago. Italian Styling.

Reading off this laundry list of clothing components, you might be thinking to yourself that I’m describing some designer parka that’s all glory, without the guts. I’m happy to report that this is furthest thing from the truth, in fact, looking at the pair of vests from this Archival Clothing x Crescent Down Works tie-up, you’d be more likely to say something along the lines of “that’s it?” But, I’d go as far as to say that that’s the point, as AC and CDW have created two vests that prove that function will always override fashion.





The (Natural) Evolution of Baracuta.

Sep 25th, 2013 | Categories: Menswear, Outerwear | by Michael Williams

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There’s an inherent risk in trying to infuse life into an old brand with a lot of history. This is exactly the challenge for the team at Italy’s WP Lavori as they attempt to pump some life into the crusty English outwear brand Baracuta. The classic coat maker and it’s famous “Harrington” jacket have played a role in the style of almost every British generation and cultural movement since they were introduced in an industrialized pre-war Manchester. Eventually, the skilled Bologna-based WP group took control of the brand and have set out to update and modernize the collection. With so many good projects under its belt –Woolrich Woolen Mills, the original Barbour Beacon range and everything ever done with ToKiTo— I’d say WP is up to the task.

While the brand was acquired a few seasons ago, it wasn’t until this SS14 season that we started to see some action in the collection. The G9 got color blocked, garment dyed and militarized bringing some change to an iconic jacket that was previously frozen in time. All of these new versions are being introduced, but the originals have remained intact. So if you are one of those people who hates change, then you don’t have to worry.

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