New York City | A Continuous Lean.

The Real McCoys New NYC Americana Outpost.

Aug 28th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear, New York City, Shopping | by Jake Gallagher

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When Japanese designer Hitoshi Tsujimoto founded The Real McCoys back around the turn of the millennium, he did so with the clear intention of creating garments that were not merely vintage inspired, but were as close to authentic reproductions as the modern man would allow. By meticulously recreating garments from the forties and fifties to their exact specs, Tsujimoto appeals to those that share his proclivity for the past, which as it turns out is quite the considerable audience. Over the past decade or so, The Real McCoys has become the destination for men that like their jackets lined in deerskin, their tees loopwheeled, and their jeans cut like Brando’s, no matter the cost (which at The Real McCoys can be eye-poppingly steep.) This success has certainly led to an uptick in stockists for the Real McCoys here in America, which no doubt has influenced their decision to finally open a proper shop on Greene Street in SoHo.

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The Bronx Brewery | Beer Off the Beaten Path

Aug 24th, 2014 | Categories: Beer, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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It doesn’t take much to brew a beer. All you need is a stove-top, some water, a few containers, a little fridge space and you’re good to go. Brewing a lot of beer though, now that’s a completely different story. Large scale brewing requires all sorts of alcohol accoutrement, but most importantly it demands space. And what does New York City not have a lot of? Space. For a brewery to find a home within the five boroughs, it takes a hefty dose of perseverance and a willingness to tread off the beaten path. This is how the Bronx Brewery found their home in the Port Morris neighborhood of the South Bronx, hardly a traditional hotspot for hops.

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A Casino in Central Park.

Aug 12th, 2014 | Categories: Americana, Cocktails, History, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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After an unfortunate five year hiatus, The Tavern on the Green threw open its doors once again on April 24th of this year, restoring some of that old New York charm to Central Park West. While the return of The Tavern on the Green is no doubt a triumphant one, the venerable restaurant, which was built eighty years ago, is not in our opinion Central Park’s most legendary restaurant, that title belongs to the long forgotten Central Park Casino.

Situated on the opposite side of the Park from where The Tavern on the Green sits today, The Casino was a rambling cottage style restaurant that bustled nightly with the sounds of upbeat jazz bands and chatter from the tuxedoed clientele. Though it was first constructed in 1864 as a rest stop for the single women who would stroll through the Park, it wasn’t until 1929 that The Casino hit its (sadly short-lived) stride.





Boerum House & Home | The Shoppable Showroom

Jul 31st, 2014 | Categories: Brooklyn, Design, Jake Gallagher, Men's Stores, New York City, Shopping | by Jake Gallagher

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Boerum‘s address reads 314 Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, but this is not the Brooklyn we’ve all come to expect. In fact the space doesn’t really feel like anywhere else in this city, but what it does feel like is a quintessential Partners & Spade production. The progressive downtown design firm, which is responsible for everything from Target ads to Sleepy Jones, was tapped by Flank, a boutique Manhattan-based architecture firm to create Boerum House & Home, so named for its Boerum Hill neighborhood.

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Choosing Your Own Adventure With Best Made.

Jul 4th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, New York City, Retail | by Jake Gallagher

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Peter Buchanan-Smith, the founder of Best Made Co. describes the brand as, “a window into the wilderness.” To Buchanan-Smith and COO Ben Lavely, the axes, first aid kits, prints, jackets, and countless other items that make up the BMC collection are meant to transport the customer from their office or apartment into the great outdoors, if only for a moment.

This notion of carrying shoppers away into the wilderness is what defines the brand’s White Street flagship. As one of downtown New York’s wealthiest neighborhoods TriBeCa is hardly the first place you’d assume a utilitarian outdoor brand would set up shop, but for Best Made, the location fulfills their ultimate goal. Once inside the shop, which opened just about a year ago, the urbanscape that lies on the other side of the door seems to slip away, and you’re transported, at least mentally, into the wild.

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A Garden Grows in an East Village Storefront.

Jun 23rd, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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As anyone who has ever received a potted present can tell you, caring for plants is a far more difficult feat than it seems. Each fern, seedling, and shrubbery requires its own delicate formula of water and sunlight. Tread too far in any direction, or worse neglect your greenery altogether, and your lush compadres will wind up as little more than a pile of scorched petals.

I can’t imagine Satoshi Kawamoto, a botanist, or as he likes to call himself a “garden stylist,” has ever had such troubles with his greenery. Kawamoto operates out of a quaint space on First Street in New York City, tending to his various plants and inventing new arrangements both for his shop and an array of clients both in New York and in his native Tokyo (where he operates five other locations.) As I enter his shop, which carries the apt moniker “Green Fingers,” on one of this winter’s first below freezing nights, I feel as if I’ve crossed into a Japanese garden rather than a faded East Village storefront.





Russ & Daughters Returns To Orchard Street.

Jun 19th, 2014 | Categories: Food, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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“That’s the thing, to eat Nova, drink seltzer, and talk about life.”

Larry, the jovial waiter in command of the front half of Russ & Daughters Cafe on Orchard Street seems to have it all figured out. As he glides from table to table dispensing not just heaping plates of smoked salmon, but his own unique brand of fish-centric philosophy, Larry does so with an easy smile which indicates that there’s no other place he’d rather be. This is his home, and he wants nothing more than to welcome you right on in.

The effortless, unironic hospitality that Larry and the rest of the Russ & Daughters team convey is so hard to find these days, especially in New York, that it’s almost jarring at first. Having opened this past month to much fanfare, the Cafe is bustling with people and there’s a wait at all hours of the day, but once I’m seated, the R&D team implores me to simply relax and smell the Nova. After all it took Russ & Daughters almost a century to return to Orchard Street, so why would they start rushing now?