New York City | A Continuous Lean.

The ACL Guide to New York Hotels Young & Old

Dec 18th, 2014 | Categories: ACL Advisor, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

The Plaza in 1910

New York City is home to a staggering two-hundred-fifty plus hotels, ranging from five star palaces to hole in the wall hostels. And yet, even with mind-boggling number of options many visitors to the city end up just settling for whatever hotel they’re most familiar with, and that right there is a colossal mistake. New York hotels, old and new, are an attraction in their own right, and each one is as unique as the city’s eight million plus inhabitants. From a stately high-rise on Madison, to a renovated factory in Williamsburg, New York has a bevy of classic and contemporary hotels that are well worth a stay.

The Classics:

The Plaza: Barefoot in the Park, Scent of a Woman, Almost Famous, The Great Gatsby, American Hustle. All these films (and many, many more) have been filmed in and around this one-hundred-seven-year old hotel, because few buildings epitomize classic New York quite like The Plaza.





Coming Home | Pop Up Flea NYC

Dec 8th, 2014 | Categories: Menswear, New York City, Pop Up Flea | by ACL Editors

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After traveling around the world these past few months, next weekend The Pop Up Flea lands back home in New York City just in time for the holidays. This is the grand poobah of all The Pop Up Flea’s, with over seventy brands  joining us at the Metropolitan Pavilion in Chelsea for our largest event ever. From five year vets like Billykirk, Alexander Olch, and Tanner Goods to first-timers Waltzing Matilda, Garrett Wade, Tudor and Askov Finlayson we’ll have all the finely crafted curiosities that you’ve come to expect from team PUF since 2009. Adding to the New York event this year will an indigo dying station from Buaisou, which we first introduced earlier this year in Japan and many more options for one-of-a-kind finds. This is the big one, so don’t miss it. More info and the complete brand list after the jump.

#PUFNYC

125 West 18th Street (nr. 6th Ave)
New York City

Friday, Dec 12th: 3pm to 8pm
Saturday, Dec 13th: 11am to 7pm
Sunday, Dec 14th: 12pm to 6pm

Free Entry. Open to the public.





Rare Weaves | A Conversation Through Clothing

Dec 4th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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“When I bring that to life…..” Hartley Goldstein’s voice trails off as he points to one of the many stacks of folded fabrics that are littered throughout his apartment like textile sandcastles. Hartley motions to these mounds again and again during my visit, less like a school teacher pointing at the blackboard, and more like a movie director walking me through storyboards. On the surface, they’re just lumps of faded indigo and patchwork scraps, but Hartley sees them as stories. Not just the stories of the past that these textiles, many of which are hundreds of years old, carry, but the stories that Hartley is yet to tell with them.

RW2





Designing Through Subtraction, Not Addition.

Nov 7th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Menswear, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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The premier C.H.C.M. in-house collection is small, occupying a single rack near the back of Sweetu Patel’s Bond Street shop, but it’s what’s missing from this already pared down selection that reveals the most about Sweetu’s latest endeavor. A few months back we had visited with Sweetu to check out a few samples that he was working on. Among this batch of drafts was a thigh-length quilted pullover jacket from Lavenham that at the time, was unlike anything we had ever seen in stores. We were instantly drawn to the novelty of this jacket. We would have handed over the credit card  for it that day if given the chance. But now, it’s nowhere to found, Sweetu decided not to produce it. Or more accurately, he deleted it from the collection.





Why We Still Need True Dive Bars

Oct 23rd, 2014 | Categories: Americana, Cocktails, Drinking, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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By definition a dive bar has no definition.

If you ask someone to define a dive bar, their answer won’t be about a dive bar it will be about their dive bar. Whether it’s the drab basement bar where they first sucked down a one dollar High Life, or some one-light-bulb hole in the wall where they continue to drink away the post-work hours, everyone’s vision of a dive bar is inherently personal.

Emily Dickinson once wrote, “I can’t tell you, but you feel it.” I imagine Dickinson was describing love (or just as likely despair) with this line, but her sentiment is just as true for a dive bar. Yes, there’s a certain atmosphere that all dives share. The outdated decor, the dusty bottles, the stone-faced bartender, the stench of stale domestic beers, a dirt cheap prices (often because the beer is just so damn bad.) We’re all familiar with these dive bar tropes, but what really makes a bar a dive is a feeling. It’s the sense that the world outside has disappeared, and for however long you sit on that raggedy polyester stool everything else can wait. It’s just you, a sweating bottle of beer, and your compatriots. Even if those compatriots are just the thoughts in your head.





Dim The Lights | NYC’s Bygone Music Venues

Oct 16th, 2014 | Categories: History, Jake Gallagher, Music, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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On any given night within New York’s incalculable array of musical venues, you can find pretty much every act imaginable. From whisper quiet jazz quartets, to over-distorted art rockers, to spoken word slam poets backed by garbage can percussionists, the nightly roster of musical acts can be as diverse as the city itself.

Regardless of your melodic tastes, there’s bound to be a show each night that you’ll find at the very least amusing, but honestly the venues themselves all fall a bit flat. Music clubs in New York used to have as much (if not far more) character as the bands that played in them, but nowadays, these venues just sort of blend together. Whether big or small they all just feel boring, if not altogether sterile. So let’s reset the record and raise a glass, or at least raise the volume to New York’s rowdy, raucous, rough-around-the-edges clubs of yore.





Revisiting McSorley’s Old Ale House

Oct 7th, 2014 | Categories: Drinking, History, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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As more and more of New York’s endearingly grimy dive bars are pushed out daily (R.I.P. Milady’s) to make room for whatever organic farm to table “bespoke ale experience,” is trending that month, the precious few hole-in-the-wall joints that we have left in this city must be treasured, least they end up out on the curb like a kicked keg. And no gritty saloon is more worthy of our admiration than McSorley’s, the self proclaimed “first Irish Tavern” in New York City.

With a tap list that includes just two options, a grimy straw floor, and an interior that hasn’t been altered since 1910, “McSorley’s Old Ale House” on 7th Street is where you go when you’ve had enough of the preening and pretension that runs rampant in downtown’s bar scene. “Light” and “dark” are the only words you’ll need to know at McSorley’s, as their minute mugs are exclusively filled with the soapy suds of their two in-house brews.