Movies | A Continuous Lean.

The Long Lasting Style of a Real Character.

Aug 20th, 2015 | Categories: History, Hollywood, Menswear, Movies, Style | by ACL Editors

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No one watches old movies anymore. With all apologies to any film scholars out there, we don’t know anyone who sits down to watch a silent film, or even a pre-war talkie these days. We don’t remember these movies anymore. But in some cases we do remember their stars. Even if you’ve never seen The General or Our Hospitality or Sherlock, Jr., chances are you know what Buster Keaton looks like. With his stone faced stare and polished attire, Keaton was one of the original straight men, playing up the madcap comedy of early cinema through his signature stoicism.

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In Fleming’s Footsteps: The Return of the Real Bond.

Aug 18th, 2015 | Categories: Books, Jared Paul Stern, Movies | by Jared Paul Stern

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The release of Spectre, the 24th Bond film and the fourth to feature Daniel Craig as 007, isn’t the only thing on the secret agent’s dossier this autumn. On Sept. 8, two months before Spectre makes its worldwide debut, Harper Collins will publish Trigger Mortis, a brand new Bond novel by Anthony Horowitz incorporating previously unpublished material written by Ian Fleming for a never-filmed television series, Murder on Wheels. Though there have been dozens of Bond books commissioned by the Fleming estate since his death in 1964 – he didn’t actually live to see very many of his iconic creation’s cinematic exploits – Trigger Mortis is the first to be set during the original timeline created by Fleming since 1968′s Colonel Sun.

That book, written by brilliant British author Kingsley Amis under the pen name Robert Markham, was a bit tricky for some Bond fans though elements of Amis’ plot were later used in filming The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. Though he had also published two other Bond-related works, a literary study called The James Bond Dossier and the cheeky The Book of Bond, Amis wrote no other Bond novels. A fictional autobiography of 007 by John Pearson appeared in 1973 followed by novelizations of The Spy Who Loves Me and Moonraker in 1977 and 1979. Then the torch was passed to British novelist John Gardner, an ex-Royal Marine Commando, who went on to write sixteen Bond books between 1981–1996.

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Wes Anderson and the Importance of the Corduroy Suit.

Mar 1st, 2015 | Categories: ACL Endorses, Menswear, Movies, Suiting | by ACL Editors

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Men’s style writers love heralding the importance of having a uniform – a signature set of clothes that you personally can own, day in, day out. In theory, most men would agree that this is a great concept, but what’s interesting is that so few of us actually put the uniform to use. Try to think of a man, any man who has a set uniform. Not easy is it? For us, there is one man who always springs to mind when we think “uniform,” and that’s Wes Anderson. He might not always wear corduroy suits, but he certainly pulls them on (and for that matter pulls them off) quite a lot.

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The Importance of Looking a Little Funny

Nov 11th, 2014 | Categories: France, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Movies | by Jake Gallagher

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French director/actor Jacques Tati’s biography states that he was born in 1907 and died in 1982, but the truth is Tati was a man immune to time. His films were comical critiques of contemporary French life, and he played characters who were constantly at odds with the modern world. As Monsieur Hulot, his most memorable character, Tati directed and starred in four films during the fifties and sixties which took a humorous, yet biting look at the progressive spirit which had proliferated throughout Post-war France. With films like Mon Oncle and Play Time, Tati explored the role of the individual within the increasingly modern world of mid-century Paris. As Monsieur Hulot he battled technology, and the steady drumbeat of progress as if to say, “wait a minute, what about me?”

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The Escape Artist | Dennis Hopper in Taos.

Sep 21st, 2014 | Categories: Americana, History, Jake Gallagher, Movies | by Jake Gallagher

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It’s become a standard Hollywood story: an actor gets burnt out by the scene and decides that they need to get out of L.A. for a little. They disappear to Marfa, or Capri, or Burning Man only to make a public re-immersion a month or so later, capped off by an interview about how “refreshing” their sabbatical was. Even vacations are punctuated by press releases these days.

The roots of these restorative respites can be traced back to Dennis Hopper, who in 1970 decamped to Taos, New Mexico. Unlike his contemporaries Hopper was driven not by his public image, but by a genuine desire to escape. After fifteen years on the silver screen – beginning with Rebel Without a Cause and concluding with his period-defining masterpiece, Easy Rider, Hopper was in need of a change of scenery. When he had arrived in Hollywood in 1955, he was a straight-laced, baby-faced kid that hadn’t even reached his twentieth birthday yet. In his polo shirts, traddy suits, and slim ties, Hopper had the clean-cut look that execs were looking for, but unfortunately, so did countless other young actors just like him.

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The Man in the White Suit

Jul 27th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Movies | by Jake Gallagher

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Five years before the debut of the classic, The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit came the release of another “The Man in the…” movie on the other side of the pond. The Man in the White Suit, which was produced by Ealing Studios and stared Alec Guinness, is far less famous than its flanneled counterpart, but is still widely considered to be one of the finest British films of the post-war period. The titles are hardly the only similarity between these two films, they both explore the existential dilemma that many people experienced following World War Two, but while The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit takes a stern approach to this subject, The Man in the White Suit follows a more comical route. Nonetheless, both films capture the insecurities of a postwar period in which the scale of life suddenly loomed large and the ever onward march of progress left many men questioning where exactly they fit into the world.

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Terry Cloth | Learning From Bond’s Mistakes.

Jul 3rd, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Movies | by Jake Gallagher

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Summer is all about fabrics that are just a touch absurd. From seersucker to patchwork madras, warm weather gear is often as lighthearted as it is lightweight, but nothing mirrors the jovial summer spirit quite like terry cloth. After all, what else is simultaneously as summery and as nonsensical as wearing a towel disguised as normal clothing?

As evidenced by the above shot of Sean Connery in a terry cloth onesie (undoubtedly one of James Bonds most regrettable outfits), during the sixties this fabric was primarily used for outlandish leisure wear. Fortunately for us all though, brands such as Orlebar Brown and Engineered Garments have recently begun to rethink this ultra-soft fabric, bringing it from the pool deck to everyday life.