Menswear | A Continuous Lean. - Page 3

A Signal Through the Noise of NYFW

Feb 23rd, 2015 | Categories: Fashion Week, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, New York City, NYFW | by Jake Gallagher


J. Crew

You’ve all seen the Instagrams. You’ve all read the tweets. You’ve maybe even looked through a collection or two. That’s right, Fashion Week has blown through New York City like a down-filled, blanket-wrapped, wax coated tornado. For anyone with even a remote interest in men’s clothing (which if you’re reading this site, is probably you) NYFW is an unavoidable cacophony of runway looks, street style images, and blurry Instagram photos. To be quite honest though, most of what goes on during this week has little to no relevance for the average guy. Many of the labels that show here in New York skew toward the avant garde and even those designer whose names you might actually recognize often show conceptual looks which will never make it stores, let alone your closet. So in an effort to skim the fat, we bring you our favorite fits from this year’s New York Fashion Week. And by favorite, we mean the ones which might actually inspire or inform your clothing purchases for the year ahead.  Enjoy our simply presented signal through the NYFW noise.

Not So Standard.

Feb 11th, 2015 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear, Shopping, Style | by Jake Gallagher


For many Japanese brands, it’s not enough to only have one line. Companies like Beams, Ships, and United Arrows love to stack up sub-brands and diffusion lines like a hastily made parfait of complementary aesthetics, which each layer bleeding over into the offer. The differences between two given brands under the same umbrella can often be tough to discern – one might be workwear-meets-streetwear, while the other might be streetwear-meets-workwear. It all tends to get lost in translation. Fortunately for Western audiences though, Japanese brands are also known for being masters of visual merchandising. Often times each label will get it’s own lookbook or ad campaign, which is (in most cases) the closest that we’ll ever come to actually interacting with these brands, as many of them are not widely available outside of Japan. This no longer rings as true for Beams and United Arrows, which have recently upped their American and European stockists, but it is still quite true for Journal Standard, another multi-label Japanese brand.


Gitman Printage | Gitman’s Greatest Hits

Feb 9th, 2015 | Categories: A Conversation With, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher


Not since the 1960′s have there been this many American based shirt brands. And yet, despite the variety of labels attached to them, never have so many shirts looked exactly alike.

We don’t mean to be overly critical, we do understand that there are only so many mills a shirt company can buy from, only so many different color combinations they can choose from, only so many ways they can reconfigure a plaid or a paisley or a polka dot. And of course, any company attempting to create clothing in America deserves our support. We just wish more companies would approach their design like Gitman Vintage does.

Why We Should All Respect Hiroshi Fujiwara.

Feb 8th, 2015 | Categories: Design, Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher


Hiroshi Fujiwara has a resume that most designers could only dream of. In his thirty-plus year career the Fragment Design founder has worked with Nike, Starbucks, Stussy, Neighborhood, Casio, Carhartt, Beats, and Disney. Oh wait, did I say in his career? Because that was just in the past year. Pull back a bit further and you’ll find names like Oakley, Cole Haan, Clarks, Sacai, Visvim, Sophnet, Converse, Levi’s, and Martin Guitar. And that’s just his work as a designer. Fujiwara is also an accomplished musician who has collaborated with Janis Ian and Eric Clapton. Oh, and if that’s not impressive enough he appeared in Lost in Translation.

A Victory for American Made Sneakers.

Feb 5th, 2015 | Categories: Footwear, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher


Victory Sportswear might just be the most important new sneaker brand out there, but there’s actually nothing new about them. We had never heard of Victory until we spotted them at this year’s Capsule trade show, but we were immediately taken by the brand’s suede and mesh trainers which look like a cross between something Carl Lewis might’ve worn at the ’84 Olympics and a pair of sneakers you might find at an orthopedic store.

Truthfully though, it wasn’t the look of the shoes that got us excited, but rather the fact that they were made in America. The only other brand making shoes in America right now is New Balance, and just like them, Victory produces their sneakers in New England (NB in Maine, Victory in Massachusetts). In fact, Victory has made its entire collection in its Massachusetts factory since the company was founded in 1980′s. The question is, where has it been this whole time? And how are we not surprised that it was Daiki and the Engineered Garments team that has unearthed them for our collective pleasure.

The Rarest Sweatshirts in the World.

Jan 19th, 2015 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher


To find one of the rarest fabrics in the world you don’t travel to the Italian countryside, or the Scottish Isles, rather you journey seven hours outside of Tokyo, to the Wakayama Prefecture. There on the southeastern coast of Japan you’ll find the Loopwheeler factory, one of the last bastions of Wakayama’s once robust manufacturing industry. Along with Merz B. Schwanen in the Swabian Mountains of Germany, Loopwheeler is one of the only remaining two factories producing authentic loopwheel terry cloth in the world.

Engineered Garments | A Club Formed From Cloth

Jan 18th, 2015 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Long Reads, Made in the USA, Menswear, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

Engineered Garments F/W '13

Engineered Garments F/W ’13

I tend to believe that you can’t fully know a person until you meet their friends. The company we choose to keep says a lot, often more than we ever can individually, about who we are as people. On a still, late July evening I found myself considering this as I glanced around Nepenthes, Engineered Garments pseudo-flagship store in Manhattan’s Garment District. The store, despite it’s out of the way location, was teeming with people. A cheery swirl of English and Japanese chatter overpowered the shop’s post-punk soundtrack as pockets of friends conversed beside the racks.

Standing on the second story loft looking down at the gleeful guests below, I realized that this was what has made Engineered Garments such a crucial brand, not only for menswear in America at large, but for me as an individual. The event was organized to celebrate the debut of Engineered Garments Spring/Summer ’15 collection, and fifteen years after the brand’s founding, people of all backgrounds, of all styles, of all occupations, were still gleefully gravitating toward the brand.

EG F/W '14

EG F/W ’14