Menswear | A Continuous Lean. - Page 3

Wash, Wear, Repeat | The Return of the Easy Wearing Suit

Jun 27th, 2014 | Categories: History, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Suiting | by Jake Gallagher

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On a summer morning in 1946, while attending a convention in Florida, Joseph Haspel Sr. donned one his company’s signature seersucker suits and waded out into the Atlantic Ocean, all the way up to his neck. As stunned beachgoers watched on, Mr. Haspel reappeared on shore, soaked to the stripes, and returned to his hotel room, where he hung up the suit to dry. Just a few hours later he resurfaced at a banquet in that he very same outfit, causing quite a stir amongst the attendees.

Founded in New Orleans in 1909, Haspel was one of the first brands to utilize cotton and seersucker for their tailored collections, forgoing the standard mohair and wool fabrics that were far too cumbersome for the heat of a southern summer. Sr.’s seaside stunt was in line with the brand’s unorthodox approach to summerweight suits, and it was the initial step in Haspel’s evolution towards the wash and wear suit.





In Defense of the Shirt Monogram.

Jun 24th, 2014 | Categories: American Psycho, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Shirts, Style | by Jake Gallagher

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The most polarizing word in menswear isn’t even a full word, it’s the three (or maybe two) letters that make up a set of initials. Nothing stirs the pot quite like a good old debate about monograms. Classicists have long labeled them as gauche and ostentatious while their contemporaries counter that they’re one of the rare ways in which a man can truly personalize his everyday attire. We’d venture to say that both sides are correct – yes, monograms are flashy but they’re also highly personal, and can help demarcate not just your shirt but you as a whole.





The Anti-Fashion of Margaret Howell.

Jun 10th, 2014 | Categories: England, Jake Gallagher, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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It feels more than a bit absurd to profess that Margaret Howell, a designer who is remarkably reserved in all facets of her work, has been generating a lot of buzz lately. And yet, with a New Balance collaboration on the way and a quintessentially crisp collection in stores now, it seems that Howell, who has oft been described as a “fashion outsider,” finds herself squarely in the center of menswear’s general purview. Despite this heightened level of interest in her designs, it would be tough to imagine Howell responding, or even thinking twice about the fact that her name has been orbiting through publications and conversations with greater frequency as of late. With nearly forty years in this industry under her belt, it’s clear that for Howell attention is not the end goal.

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Second Coming | Mark McNairy x Woolrich Woolen Mills.

Jun 5th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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“Don’t call it a comeback.”

Normally we shy away from rap references (that’s why God invented Four Pins), but we’d like to believe that Mark McNairy would appreciate an allusion to LL Cool J. After all McNairy’s relationship with rap (and the rappers that wear his clothes) is prolific enough that The New York Times devoted an entire profile to it earlier this year. While McNairy’s eponymous brand and his collaboration with BBC have garnered plenty of attention over the past year, there was a noticeable silence from Woolrich Woolen Mills, the designer’s third major endeavor.

Fortunately for us all though, earlier this year it was announced that after a one season hiatus McNairy was back at the helm of Woolrich Woolen Mills. The resulting Fall 2014 collection lies at the intersection of McNairy’s amped up Ivy sportswear and Woolrich’s eternal Americana. This is an equation that could’ve been used to describe the majority of McNairy’s work at WWM, but there’s something special about this collection, something almost otherworldly. With all of the reflective accents, techy fabrics and heightened colors, the collection looks like what would happen if a UFO had crashed in the Pennsylvania wilderness, or if Woolrich happened to have been contracted to design uniforms for NASA.

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The Many Make-Ups of Alden.

Jun 4th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

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At 130 years old, Alden might just be America’s coolest centenarian. As they cross into their 13th decade this year, Alden’s shoes has never been more in demand, with the reported wait list for a pair of custom shoes from their Middleborough, Massachusetts’ factory stretching back well over a year.

Alden was a marque name of the early aughts heritage revival, and even as the spotlight on Americana has begun to fade once again, Alden’s renaissance is as strong as ever. While the shoemaker continues to crank out a wide assortment of stock designs for their diehard customers, it’s the considerable crop of “special makeups” that Alden has produced in partnership with stores across the world that present some of the venerable shoemakers most interesting creations.





Andy Warhol and Brooks Brothers.

Jun 2nd, 2014 | Categories: Americana, Art, Jake Gallagher, Made in New York, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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Having clothed all manner of politicians, presidents, actors, and authors over the years, Brooks Brothers’ lifetime client roster reads like a veritable who’s who of American icons, but few names among that list stand out quite like Andy Warhol’s. As the ring leader of New York’s mid-century Pop Art explosion, Warhol does not immediately strike as the standard Brooks Brother’s customer, but throughout his fifty-eight years the artist remained one of the shop’s most dedicated clients, amassing a wardrobe that was almost entirely composed of Brooks Brothers staples.

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A Case for Reviving Seersucker Thursday.

May 29th, 2014 | Categories: History, Jake Gallagher, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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“Fun,” is not a word that your hear in reference to the Senate much, if at all, these days. Our governing body sits a perpetual standstill, with stone faced Senators in drab dark suits occupying both sides of the dividing line. Yes, there’s little joy left in politics these days, which is why we here at ACL propose that it’s time the Senate brings back Seersucker Thursday. Started by Senator Trent Lott in the late nineties, Seersucker Thursday added some much needed levity to D.C., that is until it was discontinued in 2012 because some Senators deemed the event too “frivolous.” But, really isn’t that the whole point? Clearly being deadly serious about every minute issue isn’t helping out our deadlocked Senate, so we say it’s high time to return some good humor to Capitol Hill. A bit of sartorial swagger wouldn’t hurt either.