Menswear | A Continuous Lean.

Why The Thom Browne Suit Won’t Die.

Nov 20th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Suiting | by Jake Gallagher

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Remember when Thom Browne just made suits? If you do, more power to you, because honestly I don’t. It was a decade ago that Browne first introduced his ready to wear line, and it was three years before that, in 2001, that he opened a haberdashery down in TriBeCa to begin selling his signature shrunken suits under the Thom Browne name. This was before all the accolades, before the infamously over the top runway shows, before Browne dressed Michelle Obama for the presidential inauguration, hell it was before he even designed womenswear. A lot has changed for Browne these past few years, as epitomized by his recent visit to The White House, but thankfully all this time he’s never messed with the suit.

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The Best Japanese Brands With The Worst Names.

Nov 18th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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As has been discussed time and time again (and again, and again, and again, and again, and again) on this site, there are some big things happening in Japan right now. Yes, we all know that Japanese designers take inspiration from America, but the fact of the matter is, we really can’t compete with the level of excitement (and honestly the amount of money) that is fueling Japan’s budding menswear community at this moment. Some brands, such as Haversack, Nanamica, Journal Standard, and N. Hoolywood have made an international impact, but many companies, especially those that are only a few collections in, remain virtually unknown here in America.

A large part of this has to do with the tendency of Japanese designers to pick really terrible brand names. No offense to Rulezpeepz or Foot the Coacher, but Japanese brands really do have an uncanny knack for unfortunate monikers. Despite their head scratching names these brands are still creating some incredible pieces, and in many ways are guiding what men are wearing, not just in Japan, but around the world. Therefore we decided to lean into the confusion and bring you the best young Japanese brands, with the worst names.





Hitting All the Blue Notes.

Nov 13th, 2014 | Categories: Denim, Jake Gallagher, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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For decades denim shirts were marked by three words: extra long tails. It was Wrangler that led the charge, boasting in ads and on store displays about their elongated shirts. The extra length was designed for Levi’s loving cowboys and blue collar workers who needed a tough shirt that wouldn’t come untucked throughout the day. This was once the prime market for denim shirts, men who would scoff at the idea of ever appearing “fashionable.”

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Oh how times have changed. That Americana staple has undergone quite a facelift over the years, and nowadays you can find denim shirts in all shapes and sizes, from cutaway collared dress shirts, to ultra distressed reproductions. Those extra long tails have now become just a small part of the denim shirt tale, so we give you our favorites after the jump. Giddy up.





The Importance of Looking a Little Funny

Nov 11th, 2014 | Categories: France, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Movies | by Jake Gallagher

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French director/actor Jacques Tati’s biography states that he was born in 1907 and died in 1982, but the truth is Tati was a man immune to time. His films were comical critiques of contemporary French life, and he played characters who were constantly at odds with the modern world. As Monsieur Hulot, his most memorable character, Tati directed and starred in four films during the fifties and sixties which took a humorous, yet biting look at the progressive spirit which had proliferated throughout Post-war France. With films like Mon Oncle and Play Time, Tati explored the role of the individual within the increasingly modern world of mid-century Paris. As Monsieur Hulot he battled technology, and the steady drumbeat of progress as if to say, “wait a minute, what about me?”

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The Athletic Brand For Non-Athletes

Nov 10th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, Sports | by Jake Gallagher

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Does a daily jogger really need the same gear as a marathon runner? Does a biker in the city really need to dress like he’s in the Tour de France? Are gym clothes supposed to look like they were developed by Nasa?

From Andrew Parietti’s perspective the answer to all of these questions is a resounding no. Parietti, along with his business partner and founder Tyler Haney, created Outdoor Voices, an American made athletic-wear brand for non-athletes. The duo, like most of us, enjoy exercise but were tired of the overwrought work out gear which most activewear companies push out today.

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Designing Through Subtraction, Not Addition.

Nov 7th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Menswear, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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The premier C.H.C.M. in-house collection is small, occupying a single rack near the back of Sweetu Patel’s Bond Street shop, but it’s what’s missing from this already pared down selection that reveals the most about Sweetu’s latest endeavor. A few months back we had visited with Sweetu to check out a few samples that he was working on. Among this batch of drafts was a thigh-length quilted pullover jacket from Lavenham that at the time, was unlike anything we had ever seen in stores. We were instantly drawn to the novelty of this jacket. We would have handed over the credit card  for it that day if given the chance. But now, it’s nowhere to found, Sweetu decided not to produce it. Or more accurately, he deleted it from the collection.





Northampton | The Cradle of Shoe Civilization

Nov 4th, 2014 | Categories: Made in England, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

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“Finishing” is the dirtiest word in high-end footwear. As shoe companies have exported their production to China or Bangladesh or any other country where the production practices are as questionable as the quality of the shoes, many English, Italian, and American brands have begun to exploit a convenient loophole when it comes to marking the country of origin. A shoe might be almost entirely produced overseas, but if it is “finished” in England then that company is free to tack on a “Made in England” label.

What exactly is finishing? Well in some cases it means that the shoe is completed in England – pieces are stitched together, the sole is affixed, etc. but in some cases it means that the shoe was finished and little more than the laces were added in England. Of course, countries have now begun to crack down on this, and it’s not exactly clear how many companies have taken advantage of these loose guidelines, but it’s enough to make savvy shoe-buyers weary. As a result, that “Made in England” tag no longer holds as much weight as it once did. Customers now want greater clarity on the exist origin of their footwear, which has narrowed the scope of “Made in England,” down to one area in particular: Northampton.

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