Jake Gallagher | A Continuous Lean. - Page 2

Where is Inis Meáin Anyway?

Apr 2nd, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Kintwear, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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Thirty miles off the west coast of Ireland lies the minuscule island of Inis Meáin. The “Middle Island” as it is called, lies at the heart of the Aran Islands, and is but three miles across with only about two hundred inhabitants. And yet, as the island’s eponymous knitwear label proves, it doesn’t take much (or many) to craft world class sweaters. It just takes the right people with the skills and the taste level.

The knitwear tradition of Inis Meáin dates back centuries, to a time when the island’s small yet mighty fishing community had no other option but to be entirely self-sufficient. The sweaters that these fishermen wore, with their cabled patterns, tight knits, and dense weaves were crafted in response to the blustery conditions out on the Atlantic Ocean. The fact that sweaters could be viewed as “stylish” probably never crossed the minds of the fishermen (nor their wives who were the ones that were likely doing the actual knitting) they were simply concerned with being warm on the sea.





Filson Ages Gracefully.

Mar 31st, 2014 | Categories: A Conversation With, Jake Gallagher | by Jake Gallagher

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The oldest person in the world is 115 years old. Filson is 116.

For a brand to outlive anyone that has ever, or will ever wear their clothes is an impressive feat in and of itself, but what’s more remarkable with Filson is that they seem to be aging in reverse. Sometime in the mid-aughts, as the heritage movement re-discovered Filson’s unflappable wares, the Seattle-based company was (almost unwittingly) thrust into the spotlight once again. And yet, Filson has never strayed from their original ideals, remaining steadfast in their dedication to quality goods that will last for years to come.

With these values in mind, Filson (who is a Paul + Williams client) has evolved their collections and fits ever so slightly as a way to reach a younger market, without ever sacrificing their spirit. Today Filson’s goods are carried in venerable outdoor stores and fashion-forward boutiques alike, as a testament to the brand’s far-reaching audience. We had a chance to speak with Filson’s CEO Alan Kirk about the brand’s storied reputation, its recent resurgence, and why Filson isn’t a “fashion” brand.





Impeccable Footwear From Diemme.

Mar 27th, 2014 | Categories: Footwear, Jake Gallagher, Made in Italy, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

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Like a Wes Anderson movie, the Diemme story does not have one true main character, rather it’s an ensemble cast, that comes together from across the world to create Diemme’s unique line of casual footwear. The shoes are manufactured in Montebulluna, Italy by Calzaturificio Diemme, with the help of two design and sales companies, Blender Agency from Norway, and GMT Tokyo in Japan, as well as MnO International, a Swedish distributor. At the heart of the Diemme project lies two brothers, Dennis and Maico Signor, who have been manufacturing boots under the Calzaturificio Diemme name since 1992.





The Unexpected Revival of Birkenstocks.

Mar 26th, 2014 | Categories: Footwear, Jake Gallagher | by Jake Gallagher

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A decade ago if you asked anyone what they thought of Birkenstocks their answer would’ve probably included some contrarian remark about either dead heads, frat bros, or both. For at least some of us though, these connotations are now a thing of the past, as we have entered into a new era in which Birkenstocks are not only acceptable, but dare we say stylish.

First produced in Germany in 1774 by Johann Adam Birkenstock, the brand’s signature slip ons have been celebrated for centuries as some of the world’s most ergonomically advanced footwear. When they were introduced to the U.S. in the sixties, they were immediately polarizing, as those that adopted Birks praised their comfort, while those that disparaged the shoes wrote them off as being plain old ugly. The shoes outdoorsy fans could care less about their critics, and Birks became an integral part of this culture, which in turn actually helped to make the shoes fashionable as mountaineering style has become popular during the past few years.





Navigating the World of Japanese Magazines.

Mar 25th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Japan, Magazines | by Jake Gallagher

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American companies publish men’s style magazines. Japanese companies publish sacred texts of the religion that is men’s clothing.

What separates Japanese publications from their American counterparts is obsession. While American writers cover clothing and the lifestyle that surrounds it, Japanese writers identify every possible minute detail, study them to death, and then publish these beautifully designed tomes of men’s style. Japanese magazines, are bound by one thing (well, aside from the language that is), density.

There’s now more publications then ever before, and each one seems to set a new pedantic high point. Flip through any of these imported publications and you’ll see page after page of these masterfully arranged stories that scrutinize and celebrate men’s clothing in a manner that hasn’t been seen since Gentry Magazine back in the fifties. While all of these titles do fall into the general category of “clothing,” each has their own quirks and characteristics that set them apart, so to help you navigate this sea of Kanji and street style photos, we give you a timely breakdown of eight of ACL’s favorite Japanese magazines.





Putting the “New” in New Balance.

Mar 21st, 2014 | Categories: Footwear, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA, Menswear, Shoes | by Jake Gallagher

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The Literal Fire – J. Crew Inferno Orange 998

The current New Balance mania that’s cutting through the sneaker world like a Vibram soled tornado has all the makings of a lost Malcolm Gladwell case study. What exactly was the tipping point that launched NB’s from average schmo staple to fodder for the insatiable menswear masses? I’ll leave that one for Gladwell’s next book, but I will say that New Balance has done an exemplary job at embracing their new-found market. Sure, those old school, all grey sneaks that the Costanza’s of the world used to wear still remain their most popular models, but over the past couple years NB has revamped their classic running shoes to create some damn fine, and for that matter, flashy, designs. It seems that every week New Balance seems to drop another “banger” (that’s what sneakerheads are saying these days right?) so we decided to round up the eight best releases of the past year.

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The Throwback – 997 Reissues





Future Fabrics | A Technical Textiles Primer.

Mar 18th, 2014 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Outerwear | by Jake Gallagher

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There was a time in the not too distant past when all of our clothes were truly organic, created along a clear path from seed to seam. Nowadays though, our textiles are not so much grown by farmers as they are developed by scientists who continuously search for new ways to make our clothes better, faster, and stronger.

This quest to meld textiles and technology has given us a whole new set of fabrics that continuously push the boundaries on what a garment can achieve, and today these cutting-edge materials have become almost commonplace. Performance wear and sportswear designers now share the common goal of crafting garments that not only stand out, but also out last their competitors, and so with these fabrics moving from REI up to Barneys, we figured we’d give you all a primer on some of the biggest names in high-tech textiles.