Hollywood | A Continuous Lean.

The Long Lasting Style of a Real Character.

Aug 20th, 2015 | Categories: History, Hollywood, Menswear, Movies, Style | by ACL Editors


No one watches old movies anymore. With all apologies to any film scholars out there, we don’t know anyone who sits down to watch a silent film, or even a pre-war talkie these days. We don’t remember these movies anymore. But in some cases we do remember their stars. Even if you’ve never seen The General or Our Hospitality or Sherlock, Jr., chances are you know what Buster Keaton looks like. With his stone faced stare and polished attire, Keaton was one of the original straight men, playing up the madcap comedy of early cinema through his signature stoicism.


The Turtleneck Comes Back Out of Its Shell.

Jan 15th, 2015 | Categories: Hollywood, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Style | by Jake Gallagher


If imitation is the highest form of flattery, than we’re a pretty flattering bunch. Even in 2014, decades after their respective primes (and in many cases, decades after their deaths) it’s still the icons – the McQueens, the Redford’s, the Newman’s, the Caine’s, et al. that we look to for our sartorial cues. It’s these erstwhile icons that we return to time and time again when we’re citing everything from sneakers to suits to smirking glances. The cause and effect(s) of our rear-view vision are a topic for another time (don’t want to exhaust our bandwidth for this month too soon) but what’s most curious about this backwards perspective is the way in which certain venerable trends rise while others sink like a remake of Alfie.

What is it about bucket hats, shawl collar sweaters, and three-roll-two jackets that made them so popular, while ascots, cowboy hats, and spectator shoes never really caught on again? Sure, there’s the simple fact that most successfully resurrected styles are easy to wear, while those that remain in the past would be considered a bit too ostentatious for contemporary wear. But, what about the turtleneck then?


The Rolling Stones Fateful Trip to Morocco.

Jun 14th, 2014 | Categories: England, History, Hollywood, Jake Gallagher, Music | by Jake Gallagher


Four years before they were exiled on Main Street The Rolling Stones, facing mounting legal troubles back in England, embarked on a fateful trip to Morocco which would forever change the course of the fledgling band. It was February of ’67 and the English press was having a field day with the Stones in the wake of a widely publicized raid at Richard’s Redlands estate which left both Mick Jagger and Keith Richards facing serious drug charges that jeopardized the future of the band. With their homeland as unfriendly as ever their handlers urged the bruised group to get the hell out of London. Morocco, an ever popular escape for Westerners, was foreign and fashionable enough for the five fresh-faced musicians, and so they set out for North Africa.


Brian Jones, the group’s original frontman and founder, had been to Morocco before and was already familiar with the country’s famous assortment of markets, music, and most importantly drugs, but before the trip really even began he grew ill. The original plan had been for Jones, his girlfriend Anita Pallenberg, and Richards to be driven through France and Spain to meet up with Jagger in Morocco, but once Jones became sick he was forced to stay behind in Toulouse, France. Pallenberg and Richards forged ahead though, and with Jones temporarily out of the picture the two fell right into each others arms, starting a relationship that would last for the next twelve years.