History | A Continuous Lean.

Having Some Fun (Shirts).

Aug 21st, 2014 | Categories: Americana, History, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Preppy | by Jake Gallagher

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“Those are some fun shirts.”

During a visit to one of his company’s shirt factories in the seventies Ash Wall, the vice president and great-great-great-grandson of Brooks Brothers founder Henry Sand Brooks, picked up a discarded “practice” sport shirt off the assembly line and tossed it on. As he did so, he uttered the above statement in reference to the ten or so different fabric scraps that had been haphazardly stitched together to form this button-up.





A Casino in Central Park.

Aug 12th, 2014 | Categories: Americana, Cocktails, History, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

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After an unfortunate five year hiatus, The Tavern on the Green threw open its doors once again on April 24th of this year, restoring some of that old New York charm to Central Park West. While the return of The Tavern on the Green is no doubt a triumphant one, the venerable restaurant, which was built eighty years ago, is not in our opinion Central Park’s most legendary restaurant, that title belongs to the long forgotten Central Park Casino.

Situated on the opposite side of the Park from where The Tavern on the Green sits today, The Casino was a rambling cottage style restaurant that bustled nightly with the sounds of upbeat jazz bands and chatter from the tuxedoed clientele. Though it was first constructed in 1864 as a rest stop for the single women who would stroll through the Park, it wasn’t until 1929 that The Casino hit its (sadly short-lived) stride.





Required Viewing | The Battered Bastards of Baseball

Aug 1st, 2014 | Categories: ACL Films, History, Jake Gallagher | by Jake Gallagher

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Hey, remember when sports were fun? You know, back before we started obsessing over trade deadlines, bloated contract deals, and whiny star players? It’s easy to forget that athletics were once valued above business, but fortunately this past month Netflix debuted The Battered Bastards of Baseball, a documentary that both makes you love Bing Russell and also reminds us a time when having fun was more important than making the big bucks.





Wash, Wear, Repeat | The Return of the Easy Wearing Suit

Jun 27th, 2014 | Categories: History, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Suiting | by Jake Gallagher

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On a summer morning in 1946, while attending a convention in Florida, Joseph Haspel Sr. donned one his company’s signature seersucker suits and waded out into the Atlantic Ocean, all the way up to his neck. As stunned beachgoers watched on, Mr. Haspel reappeared on shore, soaked to the stripes, and returned to his hotel room, where he hung up the suit to dry. Just a few hours later he resurfaced at a banquet in that he very same outfit, causing quite a stir amongst the attendees.

Founded in New Orleans in 1909, Haspel was one of the first brands to utilize cotton and seersucker for their tailored collections, forgoing the standard mohair and wool fabrics that were far too cumbersome for the heat of a southern summer. Sr.’s seaside stunt was in line with the brand’s unorthodox approach to summerweight suits, and it was the initial step in Haspel’s evolution towards the wash and wear suit.





Pining for the Newport Folk Festival.

Jun 26th, 2014 | Categories: History, Music | by Michael Williams

It’s about the time of year for the Newport Folk Festival, what has become my most liked musical outing of the year. While it doesn’t seem like I am going to make it this year (the damn thing sells out pretty quickly these days — as does the town), I got to thinking about Newport Folk recently and dug my way into these great old clips from the golden age of the festival, the heady days of 1960s.

The modern festival stands on its own with an excellently selected cast of old and new acts, a bill that is perennially stacked with classic performers and emerging artists. The crowd is a great mix as well, with a beautiful cross-section of people. It’s a respectful bunch too, helping to cement the modern 3-day music fest’s place at the top of its class.





The Rolling Stones Fateful Trip to Morocco.

Jun 14th, 2014 | Categories: England, History, Hollywood, Jake Gallagher, Music | by Jake Gallagher

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Four years before they were exiled on Main Street The Rolling Stones, facing mounting legal troubles back in England, embarked on a fateful trip to Morocco which would forever change the course of the fledgling band. It was February of ’67 and the English press was having a field day with the Stones in the wake of a widely publicized raid at Richard’s Redlands estate which left both Mick Jagger and Keith Richards facing serious drug charges that jeopardized the future of the band. With their homeland as unfriendly as ever their handlers urged the bruised group to get the hell out of London. Morocco, an ever popular escape for Westerners, was foreign and fashionable enough for the five fresh-faced musicians, and so they set out for North Africa.

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Brian Jones, the group’s original frontman and founder, had been to Morocco before and was already familiar with the country’s famous assortment of markets, music, and most importantly drugs, but before the trip really even began he grew ill. The original plan had been for Jones, his girlfriend Anita Pallenberg, and Richards to be driven through France and Spain to meet up with Jagger in Morocco, but once Jones became sick he was forced to stay behind in Toulouse, France. Pallenberg and Richards forged ahead though, and with Jones temporarily out of the picture the two fell right into each others arms, starting a relationship that would last for the next twelve years.





A Case for Reviving Seersucker Thursday.

May 29th, 2014 | Categories: History, Jake Gallagher, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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“Fun,” is not a word that your hear in reference to the Senate much, if at all, these days. Our governing body sits a perpetual standstill, with stone faced Senators in drab dark suits occupying both sides of the dividing line. Yes, there’s little joy left in politics these days, which is why we here at ACL propose that it’s time the Senate brings back Seersucker Thursday. Started by Senator Trent Lott in the late nineties, Seersucker Thursday added some much needed levity to D.C., that is until it was discontinued in 2012 because some Senators deemed the event too “frivolous.” But, really isn’t that the whole point? Clearly being deadly serious about every minute issue isn’t helping out our deadlocked Senate, so we say it’s high time to return some good humor to Capitol Hill. A bit of sartorial swagger wouldn’t hurt either.