England | A Continuous Lean.

Omersa Ottomans | Put Your Feet Up

Oct 3rd, 2014 | Categories: England, Furniture, Jake Gallagher, Luxury | by Jake Gallagher

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As we noted a few months ago, Abercrombie & Fitch catalogs are fairly common, and while these relics do present a glimpse into the once great brand, we would trade them all for just a few photographs of A&F’s old Madison Avenue location. This twelve story emporium at the corner of Madison and 45th towered over midtown Manhattan, encapsulating every conceivable item that the modern man could ever need. At its height the shop contained a shooting range, a fishing pond, an art gallery, and a golf school, but in the mid-century the store (and really the brand at large) began to shift away from outdoor pursuits towards home goods as a way of courting a younger audience that had no interest in A&F’s hunting heritage. It was around this time that they introduced Omersa’s leather ottomans to the shop. Abercrombie & Fitch was an Omersa stockist from the sixties through the eighties, but the brand’s story starts back in 1927, when “Old Bill,” a luggage maker for Liberty of London crafted a pig shaped footrest from his leftover pigskin.

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The Many Collaborations of Nigel Cabourn.

Sep 19th, 2014 | Categories: Collaborations, England, Jake Gallagher | by Jake Gallagher

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Nigel Cabourn once stated that he’s “been trying to be a designer for the last forty years.” Well, Mr. Cabourn you certainly could’ve fooled us. Having founded his first label in his early twenties, Cabourn is one of menswear’s most astute and imaginative minds, crafting spirited contemporary renditions of classic English military and sportswear designs. To complement his mainline pieces Cabourn often works in partnership with brands, both ubiquitous and unknown, to create collaborative collections that share his eponymous brand’s thoughtful approach to clothing design. We’ve rounded up Cabourn’s most impressive recent collaborations, but with a C.C. Filson collection on deck for next season, it’s safe to say that Cabourn’s best is still yet to come.





As It Happened | The Goodwood Revival.

Sep 15th, 2014 | Categories: Autos, England, Vintage | by Michael Williams

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The scene consists of cars and vintage style of every stripe. The Goodwood Revival in England is like nothing I have ever seen. I’ve been to vintage clothing centric events and I’ve been to amazing car gatherings, but this blows everything I have seen out of the water. Earlier this year I went to The Quail in Carmel, California and to the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance and neither give off the nice vibes that Goodwood does. I’ve frankly never been to anything in America that is like this event. If you are someone who likes vintage style, beautiful rare autos and the spectacular surroundings of Chichester, England, then mark this on your list.

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Drake’s Autumn Winter ’14 | Tried and True

Aug 4th, 2014 | Categories: England, Jake Gallagher, London, Made in England, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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Lookbooks are not really about clothing anymore.

They can be focused on a brand’s attitude, their surroundings, their friends, their favorite beer, maybe their favorite plant, but what they rarely provide is insight on how to actually wear the clothes. All that posturing, all that ambiance, all that hyper specific styling rarely translates into something that you can actually wear. Not so with Drake’s London though, their Autumn Winter ’14 lookbook not only conveys the brand’s style, but it’s actually an asset to their audience.





The Rolling Stones Fateful Trip to Morocco.

Jun 14th, 2014 | Categories: England, History, Hollywood, Jake Gallagher, Music | by Jake Gallagher

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Four years before they were exiled on Main Street The Rolling Stones, facing mounting legal troubles back in England, embarked on a fateful trip to Morocco which would forever change the course of the fledgling band. It was February of ’67 and the English press was having a field day with the Stones in the wake of a widely publicized raid at Richard’s Redlands estate which left both Mick Jagger and Keith Richards facing serious drug charges that jeopardized the future of the band. With their homeland as unfriendly as ever their handlers urged the bruised group to get the hell out of London. Morocco, an ever popular escape for Westerners, was foreign and fashionable enough for the five fresh-faced musicians, and so they set out for North Africa.

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Brian Jones, the group’s original frontman and founder, had been to Morocco before and was already familiar with the country’s famous assortment of markets, music, and most importantly drugs, but before the trip really even began he grew ill. The original plan had been for Jones, his girlfriend Anita Pallenberg, and Richards to be driven through France and Spain to meet up with Jagger in Morocco, but once Jones became sick he was forced to stay behind in Toulouse, France. Pallenberg and Richards forged ahead though, and with Jones temporarily out of the picture the two fell right into each others arms, starting a relationship that would last for the next twelve years.





The Anti-Fashion of Margaret Howell.

Jun 10th, 2014 | Categories: England, Jake Gallagher, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher

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It feels more than a bit absurd to profess that Margaret Howell, a designer who is remarkably reserved in all facets of her work, has been generating a lot of buzz lately. And yet, with a New Balance collaboration on the way and a quintessentially crisp collection in stores now, it seems that Howell, who has oft been described as a “fashion outsider,” finds herself squarely in the center of menswear’s general purview. Despite this heightened level of interest in her designs, it would be tough to imagine Howell responding, or even thinking twice about the fact that her name has been orbiting through publications and conversations with greater frequency as of late. With nearly forty years in this industry under her belt, it’s clear that for Howell attention is not the end goal.

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On the Hunt for Gurkha Shorts.

Apr 17th, 2014 | Categories: England, History, Jake Gallagher, Menswear, Military | by Jake Gallagher

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With its dual strap waistband, barrel cut legs, high inseam, and row upon row of pleats, the Gurkha short is certainly not for the faint of heart, but we’re sure the original Gurkha wouldn’t have it any other way. This overloaded short can be traced back to the Gurkha, a legendary Nepalese military regiment that consisted of that nation’s most fearless soldiers. The Gurkha were so revered for their bravery that even after suffering a loss to the British during the Anglo–Nepalese War in the early eighteen-hundreds, the kingdom enlisted them to fight for the English Empire.

Their legendary prowess at combat was not the only thing the Gurkha brought along with them when they joined forces with their former adversaries, for they also contributed, well their name. Overtime these shorts, which like almost all colonial garb featured a tan color and loose cut that could easily combat the often oppressive heat, were given the Gurkha name as they were so popular within the region.