England | A Continuous Lean.

How to Mold “Tough-Minded Gentlemen”

Sep 14th, 2015 | Categories: England, Jared Paul Stern, LIFE | by Jared Paul Stern


“For more than five centuries Winchester has molded tough-minded English gentlemen,” LIFE magazine wrote about one of the oldest public schools in the UK in 1951. While Winchester College in Hampshire, UK has never attained the the fame of Eton or Harrow, it is safe in the knowledge that having been founded in 1382 it is “older than almost all other public schools and the model for most of them.” For more than 500 years Winchester had been “helping to perpetuate a breed of Englishmen whose authoritative bearing and strait-laced espousal of ‘fair play’ have always set them aside as a public school product”. Winchester men call themselves Wykehamists, after their founder, William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester.

Until 1984 Wykehamists were also well known for their straw boaters, or “strats” which featured students’ house colors on the band, still sported by Old Wykehamists on Winchester Day. The term “public school”, confusing to Americans as it equates to private and boarding schools here, came about because schools like Winchester were originally established to educate poor scholars who could not afford private tutoring, with a smattering of noblemen’s sons for good measure. While some now take a public school education as a signifier of snobbery, as LIFE wrote, “To Winchester men the motto ‘Manners Makyth Man’ on the school coat of arms sums it up: rugged discipline and a sound education, not noble birth, determine a man’s stature.”


The Originals.

May 1st, 2015 | Categories: England, History, Menswear, Shoes | by ACL Editors


After the explosion of interest in men’s clothing that was catalyzed by the heritage movement of the early aughts, we now find ourselves in a pretty tumultuous time for men’s style. Brands fall in and out of favor at the drop of floppy Italian hat. Trends can rise and fizzle out in the time it takes a model to walk the length of a runway. And it is now (relatively) normal for someone to dress like a drop-crotched goth ninja one day and a soft-shouldered Neapolitan aristocrat the next. If there’s one idea that has never seemed to lose steam throughout this all though, it’s that anything made in China is less preferred than things made in Japan, Europe, America or even Canada.

If you ask us, blanket statements like this are easy to say, yet hard to fully comprehend. We don’t really believe that all things made in China are always made poorly, just as we don’t believe that all things made in America are automatically made well. With that said though, it is true that the large-scale factories that make up much of China’s clothing industry do prioritize quantity over quality, and the effects of this can be manifold. Which brings us to the story of Padmore & Barnes.


Omersa Ottomans | Put Your Feet Up

Oct 3rd, 2014 | Categories: England, Furniture, Jake Gallagher, Luxury | by Jake Gallagher


As we noted a few months ago, Abercrombie & Fitch catalogs are fairly common, and while these relics do present a glimpse into the once great brand, we would trade them all for just a few photographs of A&F’s old Madison Avenue location. This twelve story emporium at the corner of Madison and 45th towered over midtown Manhattan, encapsulating every conceivable item that the modern man could ever need. At its height the shop contained a shooting range, a fishing pond, an art gallery, and a golf school, but in the mid-century the store (and really the brand at large) began to shift away from outdoor pursuits towards home goods as a way of courting a younger audience that had no interest in A&F’s hunting heritage. It was around this time that they introduced Omersa’s leather ottomans to the shop. Abercrombie & Fitch was an Omersa stockist from the sixties through the eighties, but the brand’s story starts back in 1927, when “Old Bill,” a luggage maker for Liberty of London crafted a pig shaped footrest from his leftover pigskin.


The Many Collaborations of Nigel Cabourn.

Sep 19th, 2014 | Categories: Collaborations, England, Jake Gallagher | by Jake Gallagher


Nigel Cabourn once stated that he’s “been trying to be a designer for the last forty years.” Well, Mr. Cabourn you certainly could’ve fooled us. Having founded his first label in his early twenties, Cabourn is one of menswear’s most astute and imaginative minds, crafting spirited contemporary renditions of classic English military and sportswear designs. To complement his mainline pieces Cabourn often works in partnership with brands, both ubiquitous and unknown, to create collaborative collections that share his eponymous brand’s thoughtful approach to clothing design. We’ve rounded up Cabourn’s most impressive recent collaborations, but with a C.C. Filson collection on deck for next season, it’s safe to say that Cabourn’s best is still yet to come.

As It Happened | The Goodwood Revival.

Sep 15th, 2014 | Categories: Autos, England, Vintage | by Michael Williams

Goodwood Lead

The scene consists of cars and vintage style of every stripe. The Goodwood Revival in England is like nothing I have ever seen. I’ve been to vintage clothing centric events and I’ve been to amazing car gatherings, but this blows everything I have seen out of the water. Earlier this year I went to The Quail in Carmel, California and to the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance and neither give off the nice vibes that Goodwood does. I’ve frankly never been to anything in America that is like this event. If you are someone who likes vintage style, beautiful rare autos and the spectacular surroundings of Chichester, England, then mark this on your list.




Drake’s Autumn Winter ’14 | Tried and True

Aug 4th, 2014 | Categories: England, Jake Gallagher, London, Made in England, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher


Lookbooks are not really about clothing anymore.

They can be focused on a brand’s attitude, their surroundings, their friends, their favorite beer, maybe their favorite plant, but what they rarely provide is insight on how to actually wear the clothes. All that posturing, all that ambiance, all that hyper specific styling rarely translates into something that you can actually wear. Not so with Drake’s London though, their Autumn Winter ’14 lookbook not only conveys the brand’s style, but it’s actually an asset to their audience.

The Rolling Stones Fateful Trip to Morocco.

Jun 14th, 2014 | Categories: England, History, Hollywood, Jake Gallagher, Music | by Jake Gallagher


Four years before they were exiled on Main Street The Rolling Stones, facing mounting legal troubles back in England, embarked on a fateful trip to Morocco which would forever change the course of the fledgling band. It was February of ’67 and the English press was having a field day with the Stones in the wake of a widely publicized raid at Richard’s Redlands estate which left both Mick Jagger and Keith Richards facing serious drug charges that jeopardized the future of the band. With their homeland as unfriendly as ever their handlers urged the bruised group to get the hell out of London. Morocco, an ever popular escape for Westerners, was foreign and fashionable enough for the five fresh-faced musicians, and so they set out for North Africa.


Brian Jones, the group’s original frontman and founder, had been to Morocco before and was already familiar with the country’s famous assortment of markets, music, and most importantly drugs, but before the trip really even began he grew ill. The original plan had been for Jones, his girlfriend Anita Pallenberg, and Richards to be driven through France and Spain to meet up with Jagger in Morocco, but once Jones became sick he was forced to stay behind in Toulouse, France. Pallenberg and Richards forged ahead though, and with Jones temporarily out of the picture the two fell right into each others arms, starting a relationship that would last for the next twelve years.