Brooklyn | A Continuous Lean.

A Campaign to Save the Disappearing Diner.

Jan 28th, 2015 | Categories: Brooklyn, Food, Important Shit, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher


“Don’t it always seem to go, that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.”

It’s been forty-five years since Joni Mitchell first sang that fateful line on her hit track Big Yellow Taxi, but her words continue to ring out to this day. That line has been repeated, and repeated, and repeated over the years but for as straightforward as her sentiment may be, we’re still struggling to grasp the song’s message. This is especially true here in New York, where more and more so-called institutions of the city seem to be disappearing by the day. And no industry seems to be both more at risk, and more revered than restaurants.

At this point, it seems as if any restaurant that’s been around for more than five years, doesn’t serve some blogger approved, Instagram-ready menu of avant garde delicacies, and/or hasn’t found their niche food fad yet, is endanger of shuttering at a moments notice. And in turn, each “we’re closing” announcement is met by a chorus of complaints, and groans, and claims that New York is over. Inevitably though a week passes, and we all forget about it. We bounce back to whatever “hot new restaurant” is peaking that week, or to our favorite dollar slice spot, depending on our particular palette preferences. And honestly, when was the last time any of us ate at Soup Burg, or Cafe Edison, or El Greco or Odessa?

Brooklyn’s Japanese Textile Mecca.

Oct 9th, 2014 | Categories: Brooklyn, Jake Gallagher, Japan | by Jake Gallagher


The first thing Stephen Szczepanek pointed out after I arrived at his 1,200 square foot at the tip of McCarren Park in Greenpoint, Brooklyn was that the various stacks of fabric thoughtfully laid out throughout his apartment were organized by type. As he explained that he’d just returned from Japan this past month, Stephen pointed at the neat piles, listing off names like Shibori, Sashiko, and Kasuri. In two minutes he had casually rambled off more information about antique textiles than most so-called clothing connoisseurs could amass in their entire lives, but as I discovered over the next hour, this was just a glimpse of Stephen’s nearly encyclopedic knowledge on ancient fabrics, which has manifest itself as Sri Threads.

Sri was born during the last gasp of the booming early aughts, after Stephen decided that it was time to turn his love for Japanese fabrics into something more than a passion project. Prior to Sri, Stephen had worked as an art curator, overseeing a private collection of, among other pieces, Asian art, which gave him a first hand introduction to the world of Far East fabrics. After growing weary of his curatorial position, Stephen started his own business in early 2001, opting for the optimistic name Sri, which is a title for the Hindu goddess of prosperity. Unfortunately, in the wake of 9/11 the U.S. economy plummeted, and Stephen struggled with levering the weak dollar against the yen, but he persevered, and over the next decade both his stock and client roster rose steadily.


Boerum House & Home | The Shoppable Showroom

Jul 31st, 2014 | Categories: Brooklyn, Design, Jake Gallagher, Men's Stores, New York City, Shopping | by Jake Gallagher

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Boerum‘s address reads 314 Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, but this is not the Brooklyn we’ve all come to expect. In fact the space doesn’t really feel like anywhere else in this city, but what it does feel like is a quintessential Partners & Spade production. The progressive downtown design firm, which is responsible for everything from Target ads to Sleepy Jones, was tapped by Flank, a boutique Manhattan-based architecture firm to create Boerum House & Home, so named for its Boerum Hill neighborhood.

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Beyond the Necktie | Introducing the Hill-Side Clothing.

Feb 25th, 2014 | Categories: Brooklyn, Jake Gallagher, Menswear | by Jake Gallagher


Since founding The Hill-Side in the late aughts, brothers Emil and Sandy Corsillo have always seemed to carry themselves with the deliberate pace of a marathon runner. Everything began with a simple necktie, followed by a pocket square, and then a scarf, which soon blossomed into a full accessories collection which was largely based on interesting and unique fabrics. It’s a stepwise approach which has helped the Corsillo’s steadily grow their business, without stepping out too far from that original square-end necktie.

Well all that is about to change. With the launch of a more complete clothing collection in Fall 2014, the brothers are essentially taking the Hill-Side into that pivotal four minute mile territory. What began with a tie will now include sport coats, shirts, hats, sneakers, wallets, bags, and pins, all made in the USA or Japan, and all cut from from the Hill-Side’s ever-growing assortment of off-kilter textiles. We instantly gravitated toward the jackets, which reminded us of a casual sack suit, juxtaposing a three-roll-two button stance, and open patch pockets, with a shorter cut and a removable throat latch.


Celebrating 40 Years | Inside the Timberland Brooklyn Workshop.

Oct 22nd, 2013 | Categories: Brooklyn, Footwear, Sponsored Post | by Michael Williams

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To celebrate its 40th anniversary, Timberland set up an interactive worksop on the Brooklyn waterfront to celebrate the brand’s past, speak to the future, and to gather a panel of creative people to explore how creativity and style exist in the present. The event was a nice amalgamation of Timberland’s history and the current expression of its fall style that was on display throughout the space. In an upstairs auditorium, Timberland assembled five creative individuals to talk through modern creativity and speak about how style intersects with their lives. The group consisted of photographer Noah Kalina (who along with some of the guys from the Rig Out made a short film that celebrates the limited edition pieces from the Timberland 40th Anniversary), Complex Style Editor Matthew Henson, Christine Cameron of My Style Pill and myself. In addition to the conversation on style, each of the panelists and myself reflected our own personal style and taste in a physical space on the main floor of the Timberland workshop. Timberland’s Design Director Chris Pawlus gave insight into how Timberland’s style, performance and ruggedness have dovetailed into one of the world’s most respected brands.ACLSPONSORED_041613_OMG-1-1

Made in Brooklyn Since 1945.

Mar 30th, 2013 | Categories: Brooklyn, Video | by Michael Williams

The Made in Brooklyn series from filmmaker Dustin Cohen won’t stop telling good stories. The subject this time is Frank Catalfumo of F&C Shoe Rebuilding in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn who’s been making and fixing footwear out of his little shop since 1945. Despite being 91 years old (or ninety and a half as he says), Frank is still going strong working five days a week alongside his son Michael. It’s really interesting to hear about how the neighborhood has changed in the nearly seventy years since he’s been there. While Bensonhurst may not have stayed the same, Frank with his sunny outlook has persevered.


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In the Shop | Stanley & Sons SS13

Aug 7th, 2012 | Categories: Bags, Brooklyn, Made in the USA | by Michael Williams

Stanley & Sons is an easy thing to like. I’ve been a fan since my first encounter a few years back. There’s a certain aesthetic correctness to everything they do — from the art direction of the website to the physical products — that I have always appreciated. The tiny company operates out of a basement space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn that serves as showroom, factory and head office all in one. Enter through the hatch in the sidewalk and walk to the back, you can’t miss ‘em. I stopped by last Friday to see the new SS13 collection and to see what Stanley & Sons has been up lately.