Books | A Continuous Lean.

In Fleming’s Footsteps: The Return of the Real Bond.

Aug 18th, 2015 | Categories: Books, Jared Paul Stern, Movies | by Jared Paul Stern


The release of Spectre, the 24th Bond film and the fourth to feature Daniel Craig as 007, isn’t the only thing on the secret agent’s dossier this autumn. On Sept. 8, two months before Spectre makes its worldwide debut, Harper Collins will publish Trigger Mortis, a brand new Bond novel by Anthony Horowitz incorporating previously unpublished material written by Ian Fleming for a never-filmed television series, Murder on Wheels. Though there have been dozens of Bond books commissioned by the Fleming estate since his death in 1964 – he didn’t actually live to see very many of his iconic creation’s cinematic exploits – Trigger Mortis is the first to be set during the original timeline created by Fleming since 1968′s Colonel Sun.

That book, written by brilliant British author Kingsley Amis under the pen name Robert Markham, was a bit tricky for some Bond fans though elements of Amis’ plot were later used in filming The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. Though he had also published two other Bond-related works, a literary study called The James Bond Dossier and the cheeky The Book of Bond, Amis wrote no other Bond novels. A fictional autobiography of 007 by John Pearson appeared in 1973 followed by novelizations of The Spy Who Loves Me and Moonraker in 1977 and 1979. Then the torch was passed to British novelist John Gardner, an ex-Royal Marine Commando, who went on to write sixteen Bond books between 1981–1996.


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I Know You Think You Know It All.

Jun 3rd, 2015 | Categories: Books | by Michael Williams


Being good at Twitter isn’t something I would normally say about someone. Now this goes beyond understanding social media as a professional, and it’s more than being a “digital native” whatever that actually means. But when I think about Chris Black who’s new book I Know You Think You Know It All was inspired by his informative use of social media, I almost always come to the realization that this guy is just good at Twitter. Obviously Chris is good at many other things and not just some highly evolved Twitter jockey. If you know Chris in real life it is easy to see how his brand of quirkiness and humor translate so seamlessly to first Twitter’s punchy medium, but also to this humorous (and honestly, helpful) new book. I met with with Chris for a quick Q&A at one of my favorite haunts Lafayette to see if perhaps I do actually do know it all.

Michael Williams: How did this, or when did the idea for the book come about? … When did you first get the idea for something like this?

Chris Black: I didn’t have the idea, actually.  Powerhouse had the idea.

MW: Oh really?

CB: Powerhouse approached me about doing it, and I was obviously open to it.  Who doesn’t want to make a book, you know what I mean?  Especially if someone asks you.  But it was you know his, Wes from Powerhouse who’s my publisher, I think the idea stemmed from Twitter, you know.  That’s where he got the idea from.

MW: He saw your Twitter?

CB: Yeah, and him and I were friendly, and he followed me and his wife, who follows me too, and they like kinda talked about it is the story that I heard and then they asked me if I would do it, and I was like yeah man, whatever, you know.

MW: So were they thinking like you know you’re good at Twitter, obviously.  You’re a quasi social media professional.

CB: Very quasi.


Living Vicariously Through Other People’s Junk.

Apr 23rd, 2015 | Categories: Americana, Antiques, Art, Books, Brimfield | by ACL Editors


With her stomping cowboy boots, men’s riding jackets, and worn-in leather vests, Mary Randolph Carter doesn’t dress like any executive we’ve ever met. And yet, since 1988, Carter has been a creative director and executive at Ralph Lauren, following stints as an editor at Self, Mademoiselle, and New York Magazine.

On the Ralph Lauren spectrum, Carter is more RRL than Polo. In fact we’d even take it one step further and say that Carter’s aesthetic is really closer to Polo Country, the now defunct precursor to RRL which was more South, than Southwest. Carter is well-known (possibly even more so than for her association to RL) as a collector of what she calls “junk,” but what would more kindly be described as folksy flea market collectibles. It’s this widely documented collection which has made Carter a legend in her own right, as everyone from The Washington Post, to The New York Times, to The Selby has explored Carter’s massive collection of rusty signs, hand-painted family portraits, curling photographs, yellowing books, Lady of Guadalupe bracelets, and just about every other obscure knick-knack imaginable.

A Book/Shop in C.H.C.M.

Sep 29th, 2014 | Categories: Books, Jake Gallagher, Men's Stores, Menswear, New York City | by Jake Gallagher


Book/Shop was founded by Erik Heywood in Oakland, California back in 2007 as a way to showcase and sell his substantial collection of used and rare books. For years, Heywood’s shop remained comfortably in California, with the occasional pop-up elsewhere, but earlier this summer Book/Shop officially found an East Coast home at New York’s C.H.C.M. Tucked in the corner of C.H.C.M.’s Bond Street store, the Book/Shop permanent pop-up will feature a rotating selection of art books, as well as hard-to-find texts of all sorts. These books were no doubt picked as much for their design as for their subject matter, and their arresting covers are the perfect compliment to C.H.C.M.’s sharp space.


Take a Trip….To the Magazine Store.

Jul 9th, 2014 | Categories: Books, Jake Gallagher, Magazines, Travel | by Jake Gallagher


As anyone who has recently taken, planned, or even considered a trip can attest, travel is not the glamorous pursuit that it once was. And yet, despite (or perhaps in response to) the endless string of headaches that can stem from taking a vacation in 2014, this year has also been marked by a resurgence of the travel magazine industry. As many household names have finally received some much needed facelifts, and the indie vacation publication world has surged, there has never been a better time to live vicariously through the glossy pages of a travel magazine. Here’s our list of the most exciting travel titles on the stands today, just think of it as your chance to actually enjoy a getaway, minus the endless TSA lines, infinite flight delays, and locker-sized Economy seats.

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Goldeneye | The Estate That Bond Built

Apr 22nd, 2014 | Categories: Books, History | by Jake Gallagher


While Ian Fleming himself never liked to be compared to the fictitious secret agent that he wrote to life during his twilight years, Mr. Fleming and James Bond were kindred spirits through and through. Fleming, much like 007, was wealthy, well-educated, and even served as a British intelligence officer during WWII. It was during this stint in the service that Fleming first visited Jamaica, the island destination from which he would pen all fourteen of his James Bond novels. Having fallen in love with the tropical atmosphere, which was unlike anything he had encountered during his English upbringing, Fleming returned to Jamaica at the conclusion of the war and purchased a plot of waterfront property on northern coast of the island. Dubbing it “Goldeneye,” a name borrowed from a covert plan he had developed during the war, Fleming constructed a modest house overlooking the Caribbean where he would spend each winter for the following decades.

Willy Vlautin Tells It Like It Is.

Mar 20th, 2014 | Categories: Al James, Americana, Books | by Al James

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Has the recent finale of HBO’s True Detective left you jonesing for more pulpy American grit? Do you like your heroes broken-hearted yet courageous, desperate but loyal? Does your hard luck story require just the thinnest beam of light to pierce the looming darkness? Then author Willy Vlautin is your guy.

A Reno, Nevada native, Vlautin moved North to Portland, Oregon in the nineties to paint houses. When he wasn’t up on the ladder he wrote and played in bands. He founded, and still fronts, Richmond Fontaine, one the most-loved rock bands to come out of the Northwest. Starting with The Motel Life in 2007, he has published four novels that fit on the shelf next to Steinbeck’s Cannery Row, Denis Johnson’s Jesus’ Son and Larry Brown’s Big Bad Love. Immensely talented company, but Vlautin’s work is at home with these greats.

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