Adventure | A Continuous Lean.

A Bloody Good Time: At the Bullfights in San Miguel.

Mar 23rd, 2014 | Categories: Adventure, Jared Paul Stern, Long Reads | by Jared Paul Stern

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Blood sports aren’t all that popular these days. But bullfighting, beautiful, brutal and balletic, has been an important part of Spanish culture for hundreds of years. In the otherwise tame artists’ and expats’ town of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, founded by the Spanish in 1511, we attended a bullfight recently and came away with one of the most authentic, un-touristy experiences we’ve ever had abroad, one that’s seared in our memory forever. While bullfights have been banned in some countries and toned down in others, in San Miguel tradition holds fast. Hemingway wrote that for a country to love bullfighting “the people must have an interest in death.” That’s certainly true in Mexico’s case, think of dia de muertos. Going to see one felt slightly illicit at first, gothic, decadent and antiquated, as befits what the author and bullfighting aficionado called “the only art in which the artist is in danger of death.”

We won’t get into a discussion of animal rights here, but while unquestionably meeting a cruel and bloody end the bulls are said to have a far better life than most of their ilk up until the final hour. And though they haven’t got much of a chance, there’s always the possibility that the bull will do some damage. The matador who risks nothing will never achieve greatness, and the best bullfighters stick their necks out the farthest. Prayers to the Virgin of Guadalupe are given before each event. In San Miguel the bullfight, or corrida, is in fact a corrida de rejones, meaning that the matadors – in this case rejoneadors – are mounted on horses. That may sound safer but repeatedly stabbing a raging, stampeding bull in the back, from the front, on horseback at full tilt while wearing a suit and hat takes serious cojones.

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50 Years After the First Ascent.

Apr 18th, 2013 | Categories: Adventure, History | by Michael Williams

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Eddie Bauer —the original expedition outfitter of American Everest explorers— recently sent a team of mountaineers to return to the deadly peak’s West Ridge to commemorate the historic anniversary of the 1963 climb of Jim Whittaker who is credited as the first American to summit the world’s tallest peak.

The short video below helps tell the story of the first Americans to stand on the summit. Eddie Bauer also created this beautiful web feature that highlights the adventure that Whittaker and his comrades shared, along with the gear that took both the 1963 team and the 2013 teams to the top.