Archives for October 2013 | A Continuous Lean. - Page 2

Feeling Super Tuscan | A Visit to Fontodi.

Oct 24th, 2013 | Categories: Food, Italy, Wine | by Michael Williams

Fontodi_Tuscany_15

When people think about the food in Italy, it’s probably safe to say that steak is not the first thing people would call out. Though, the pleasure of Bistecca Fiorentina and a bottle of Super Tuscan are rarely out shined.

The massively thick chunk of rare meat paired with a delicious wine is a meal that I enjoy roughly twice a year in Florence if I am lucky. And while I only get to enjoy this meal a handful of times, it’s something I constantly crave it throughout the year. Every New York steak house is blunted by my desire for super thick and rare beef with crispy edges. No matter how good the steakhouse, no matter how delicious the bottle, nothing compares to having the real thing in Italy.

On my most recent trip to Italy, I decided that the best way to spend my last day would be to make the roughly hour drive from Florence to Chianti Classico near the town of Panzano to spend the day at the Fontodi winery with its owner Giovanni Manetti. A visit to Fontodi was a recommendation by the respected Italy-based food writer Faith Willinger. She extolled Fontodi as both an excellent producer and also an estate that is known to be extremely beautiful. Both of these facts were quickly confirmed. Looking back, Faith couldn’t have suggested a better place to visit and it would be difficult to find a vineyard that is more hospitable.

Situated in some of the best grape growing land in Tuscany, the area is referred to as “Conca d’Oro” (the golden shell), due to the way it is situated to receive extended exposure to the sun. Fontodi is best known for Flaccianello, its excellent Super Tuscan. The flagship wine is made using a delicate process that has been refined and masted over several generations by the Manetti family. The family is also a long-time maker of terra cotta and many of the orange tiled roofs of Florence have been made by the family for hundreds of years.

Fontodi_Tuscany_19





Where Are You From? | The LBM Dispatch Series

Oct 23rd, 2013 | Categories: Al James, Photography, Travel | by Al James

LBMDispatch

If you want an unflinching view of present-day America, look no further than Magnum photographer Alec Soth and writer Brad Zellar’s self-published LBM Dispatch Series. Drawing from the tradition of Steinbeck’s Travels With Charley and Kerouac and Frank’s The Americans, it is a serial journal of photos and writings that unfolds state by state, telling the stories of how we Americans are living today; how we get by, how we chase dreams, how we gather together and connect. As a photographic newspaper or travelogue, the LBM Dispatch bridges the gap between the immediacy of a blog and the beauty and permanence of an art book with each edition edited, laid out, printed and shipped just a week or two after the trip is completed. Empathetic, genuine, humorous and inspiring – the LBM Dispatch is a reminder that America is richer, sweeter and more nuanced than pollsters and cable television pundits would have us believe. Soth and Zellar were kind enough to answer a few questions for ACL about how the project came about and where they plan on taking it.

ACL: I assume that the newsprint format that you use for the LBM Dispatch was a discovery you made with The Last Days of W. What is it about newsprint that feels right for this project?

Alec Soth: Yes, that is true, but there are differences. The Last Days of W. was never a fully-fledged project. In that case I was digging through old photographs and wanted to make something that was modest and impermanent. So newsprint made sense, but it wasn’t actually constructed like a newspaper. With a writer and photographer going out telling stories, Dispatch is much more like a newspaper. And the immediacy of the form also made sense. But the project is much more ambitious than Last Days. That is partly why, in fact, we no longer print on newsprint. The first two issues were done that way, but the quality was just so meager —particularly in the dark values— that we switched to offset printing. This made the whole process much more expensive.

ACL: I love the idea that the LBM Dispatch is inspired by local newspapers. I grew up in a rural logging town in Oregon and our local paper takes itself just as seriously as say The New York Times, which I think is great. I feel like you guys approach the work in the same way. How does this idea or framework of being reporters help propel the stories and trips along.

Brad Zellar: It’s certainly the key to the whole thing. Although we don’t represent ourselves as reporters, our approach to the work is still very much a hunt for newsworthy or interesting stories and characters. I worked at my own local daily newspaper in a small Minnesota town, and the things that interested me way back when —the profiles of local people and the search for colorful or poignant yarns and haunted history— are still the things I tend to look for.

AS: I’m prone to self-indulgence. I’m much more likely to daydream or ponder my own neuroses than investigate the world ‘out there.’ One of the reasons I was interested in joining the photo agency Magnum is that I figured their tradition of doing documentary work would help keep me honest – keep pushing me out into the world. But I go back and forth. My last project, Broken Manual, was definitely inward looking. Afterward, I realized I needed to balance things out. But doing editorial work was increasingly unsatisfying. So Brad and I started our own paper. While it isn’t a conventional newspaper, having that as the backbone of the project does keep me from doing too much navel gazing.

Colorado1

Comments Off




Celebrating 40 Years | Inside the Timberland Brooklyn Workshop.

Oct 22nd, 2013 | Categories: Brooklyn, Footwear, Sponsored Post | by Michael Williams

Timberland Workshop5

To celebrate its 40th anniversary, Timberland set up an interactive worksop on the Brooklyn waterfront to celebrate the brand’s past, speak to the future, and to gather a panel of creative people to explore how creativity and style exist in the present. The event was a nice amalgamation of Timberland’s history and the current expression of its fall style that was on display throughout the space. In an upstairs auditorium, Timberland assembled five creative individuals to talk through modern creativity and speak about how style intersects with their lives. The group consisted of photographer Noah Kalina (who along with some of the guys from the Rig Out made a short film that celebrates the limited edition pieces from the Timberland 40th Anniversary), Complex Style Editor Matthew Henson, Christine Cameron of My Style Pill and myself. In addition to the conversation on style, each of the panelists and myself reflected our own personal style and taste in a physical space on the main floor of the Timberland workshop. Timberland’s Design Director Chris Pawlus gave insight into how Timberland’s style, performance and ruggedness have dovetailed into one of the world’s most respected brands.ACLSPONSORED_041613_OMG-1-1





Behold The Slim J. Press Shaggy Dog.

Oct 21st, 2013 | Categories: Jake Gallagher, Preppy | by Jake Gallagher

Shetland Jpress

Since the dawn of trad, Shetland sweaters have been the knit of choice for natty East Coasters and those that study their style. The only catch is that, like so many other classic Ivy pieces, Shetland sweaters traditionally fit about as well as a burlap sack. For all of us who have tried to pull off the “young John Updike” look only to come out looking like men in Shetland dresses, J. Press York Street’s trim Shaggy Dogs are the holy grail of updated American style.

Not all Shetlands are Shaggy Dogs, but all Shaggy Dogs are Shetlands, and that’s not the start to an IQ test question, just a crucial point of clarification. While a Shetland denotes any sweater produced on the Shetland Islands using that region’s distinct lightweight yet robust wool, Shaggy Dogs are a creation that is all J. Press’ own. As opposed to being shorn down for a more uniform texture, J. Press decided (and full disclosure, J. Press is a Paul + Williams client) to fluff out their knits creating a unique brushed look that certainly lives up to its unkempt monkier.





Past Meets Future | Woolrich x Topo Designs

Oct 20th, 2013 | Categories: Accessories, Jake Gallagher, Made in the USA | by Jake Gallagher

Woolrich Topo Designs3

Topo Designs was founded in 2008, which would make them something like Woolrich’s great-great-great-great-grandson, but there’s no doubt that both brands are made of similar DNA. While they were started on opposite sides of the country in separate centuries, both Topo Designs and Woolrich have been integral to their respective epochs when it comes to guiding the look of functional outerwear. It’s for this reason that the Topo Designs x Woolrich collection feels less like something designed and more like something that just happened naturally.

In Topo’s Colorado factory, Woolrich’s buffalo checked plaids and pea coat weight wools have been converted into a collection that adds something new to the Topo roster, without detracting from the original spirit of either brand. These woodsy Woolrich patterns lend themselves perfectly to the clean look of Topo’s bags, pairing Topo’s innovative designs with Woolrich’s enduring aesthetic





Charting Classic N.Y. | Hawking Hamburgers at J.G. Melon

Oct 19th, 2013 | Categories: Food, Jake Gallagher, New York City | by Jake Gallagher

2

A pungent scent has begun to blanket New York, and no I’m not referring to that funky smell coming from the Lower East Side, I’m talking about the alluring aroma of sizzling burgers that’s rising up from griddles all across the city. Between the now numerous Shack Shake stands (respected, but generally overwhelmed with tourists), the East Coast debut of Umami Burger [delicious to the power of the magical fifth sense, but easier to just enjoy in LA), and the “bespoke” burger which can be found at high end (and high ticket) eateries New York has been swept up in full blown burger mania. The great burger debate has now become a relentless pastime for gourmands throughout the five boroughs with no consensus in sight. While you might be harboring your own unwavering patty preference, the common ground on ground beef lies in history, and no burger joint is more fit for the history books (or at least in the Preppy Handbook) than J.G. Melon.





The British Invasion | Bloomingdale’s Style.

Oct 18th, 2013 | Categories: Sponsored Post, Video | by Michael Williams

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of The Beatles coming to New York and the start of the British Invasion, Bloomingdale’s has looked to Britain for inspiration this fall. The iconic retailer has assembled over 50 British brands like Turnbull & Asser, London Undercover and Hardy Amies. to create more than 30o excellent exclusives for the season. You can shop it all here.

ACLSPONSORED_041613_OMG-1-1

Comments Off