Archives for May 2011 | A Continuous Lean. - Page 2

The Ace of Lace

May 18th, 2011 | Categories: Corey Wilson, Sports | by Corey Wilson

My old pal with a lot of wear, eager for an overhaul.

For the past 25 summers, I’ve played some form of baseball. And while the balls and bats changed from t-ball to baseball to beer-league softball, with the occasional game of wiffle ball in between, I’ve been using the same glove (or mitt) since I was 13…and it was beginning to show. My reliable USA-made Rawlings “Gold Glove Series” Pro 1000-H infielder’s glove, was in tatters. But instead of tossing it out this season, in favor of a newer, fancier model (with a tacky velcro strap!), I decided to have it restored.

Hell, I figured if someone could make my broken down, bench-made brogues look like new, then why not my ball glove? It turns out, there is a guy in Lynbrook, NY (“a small village on Long Island, barely 15 miles from Ebbets Field and 20 miles or so from the Polo Grounds and Yankee Stadium,” according to his web site) that specializes in such a craft. Dick Wilson (no relation), otherwise known as the “Ace of Lace,” has been reviving gloves for nearly 50 years. In his past life, he owned and operated Sportorama (editor’s note: amazing name!), a sporting goods store in nearby Baldwin, NY. But after retiring in 1992, he’s been honing his skills, repairing as many as 30 baseball gloves a month.





Deadstock for Days

May 16th, 2011 | Categories: Tokyo, Vintage | by Michael Williams

While in Tokyo last week with the folks from Red Wing (who is a client, full disclosure and all that good stuff) we fell upon what turned out to be the most amazing cache of deadstock Red Wings that I have ever seen all together in one place. Everything was unworn and for sale — only in Japan my friends. More here.





SIGNALS

May 16th, 2011 | Categories: SIGNALS | by Michael Williams

  • Gear Patrol co-founder Eric Yang got his hands on a Fujifilm X100 and I secretly hate him for it. [Gear Patrol] [Pictured]
  • Fellow Clevelander Eric Kvatek found a congressman’s old Vietnam-era field jacket in a thrift store. [Dispatches]
  • Foster Huntington started a new site that I would have named “My Favorite Stuff, Which When Neatly Laid Out in a Photo, Happens to Coincidentally Look Like A Less Violent Version of Everyday Carry but With Homeowners Insurance” [The Burning House]
  • Things I recently learned: Valet has a new column and Sid Mashburn wears a Rolex Explorer to the beach. [Wants & Needs at Valet]
  • American-looking (but actually foreign) college students entertaining themselves with nothing but a phone booth c.1959 [LIFE] [Thanks Andy]

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At Auction: Pan Am Pilots’ Rolexes from the ‘50s & ‘60s

May 12th, 2011 | Categories: Auctions, Jared Paul Stern, Watches | by Jared Paul Stern

The major spring sales of ‘important timepieces’ are taking place in Geneva this weekend with some eye-popping offerings on the vintage Rolex front. Pick any of the auctions at Sotheby’s, Christie’s and Antiquorum and you’ll find rarities you can lust after, if not actually afford. An ultra-exclusive chronograph from 1942 is likely to fetch over a million bucks at Christie’s on May 15 and break the world record, while there are dozens of rare “Paul Newman” Daytonas of every description. Some of the oldest examples show some wear and patina that might “devalue” them but only adds to their appeal in our eyes.





Shopping Milan | G. Lorenzi

May 10th, 2011 | Categories: Italy, Milan, Shopping | by Michael Williams


The one shop that really stood out to me in Milan didn’t have any fine Italian tailoring in sight, it was all about the knives. Founded in 1929, G. Lorenzi is really like no other retail establishment I have ever been in, ever. The walls are lined with dark wooden display cases which are very neatly organized with an array of all things man. Knives, pipes, brushes, clippers, trimmers, shaving supplies, cologne, a huge selection of every possible type of scissors and basically every other little well made accoutrement you can think of. The obsessiveness of G. Lorenzi rivals some of the crazy stuff I have seen in Japan. And don’t get me wrong, the place is no C.O. Bigelow steroids, its roots are in knife sharpening and G. Lorenzi is above all famous for it’s cutlery. A logical pursuit given Italy’s obsession with food.





Faulkner at West Point

May 9th, 2011 | Categories: History, Jared Paul Stern, Style | by Jared Paul Stern

In April of 1962, nearly 49 years ago this day, author William Faulkner visited the United States Military Academy at West Point at the invitation of Major General W.C. Westmoreland. On the night of April 19 he read excerpts from his forthcoming novel The Reivers before a rapt audience of cadets, faculty, and staff. The following day, clad in a Donegal tweed suit and repp tie, he lunched with the brass and met with cadets in two advanced literature courses and discussed a wide range of subjects including his work, philosophy of life and views on America.

Faulkner was not himself much of a military man, though critics have noted his “lifelong romance” with the military experience beginning with his first novel Soldier’s Pay in 1926; unable to join the U.S. Army due to his short stature, he had enlisted in the British Royal Flying Corps during World War I but never saw action. Nonetheless he exuded something of a military bearing on the stage at West Point with his pipe and British officer’s mustache.





As it Happened | ACL in Italy

May 7th, 2011 | Categories: As it happened | by Michael Williams

Milan

Venice

Florence